Students at SFU’s Beedie School of Business have raised money for cancer research for three years.

Surrey business students empty pockets for cancer research

Beedie School raised $80,000 through fundraising events.

Students at Simon Fraser University’s Beedie School of Business leveraged a project management class project to raise funds for cancer – and after narrowly failing to reach their ambitious $30,000 target, dipped into their own pockets to make up the shortfall.

It was the third consecutive time Beedie School Professor Kamal Masri has run the project in his Business 361 Project Management class, raising over $50,000 in total in 2013 and 2014 – for a grand total of $80,000.

The 25toLife project tasks students with organizing a series of events to raise funds for the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS).

Nine events in the fall included a sponsored climb up the 35 flights of stairs at Harbour Center (SFU Vancouver campus), a moustache-themed pub night, and a five-kilometer obstacle course sponsored by Steve Nash Fitness.

A last minute Christmas-themed event, led by BBA student Rhythm Tang, helped bring the total contributions just $400 shy of the target.

Determined not to fail by such a small amount, students reached into their pockets and began passing $10 and $20 bills to the front of the class – an unprompted gesture resulting in a $30,043 cheque to the CCS.

“It was truly humbling to be a part of such a dedicated team of students intent on raising funds for cancer research to support individuals affected by the disease,” said Beedie School of Business undergraduate Jordan Binotto.

“The project pushed us all to the limits but was one of the coolest experience in my undergraduate career. Learning about project management in class and immediately implementing our knowledge for such a worthy cause was so fulfilling.”

Last year, Masri was awarded the Canadian Cancer Society’s Community Champion Award in recognition of his efforts in spearheading the 25toLife project.

“There is no better way to learn about project management than putting business education into action, and the 25toLife project is a perfect example of experiential learning benefiting a worthwhile organization,” said Masri.

“The Canadian Cancer Society has been very supportive of the students over the last three years, and they deserve a lot of credit for the success of the project.”

For more information on the 25toLife project, visit twentyfivetolife.ca

Just Posted

Surrey celebrates multiculturalism with annual Fusion Festival

The two-day festival returns to Holland Park

RCMP investigate two shootings in Surrey

Incidents happened in Whalley, Newton

Surrey Board of Trade fears SkyTrain expansion will impede other transit needs

‘We need transit improvements in all of Surrey,’ Anita Huberman says

Public hearing set for two Surrey modular housing projects for homeless

Surrey council set to vote Monday on projects in Guildford, Whalley

Rich the Vegan scoots across Canada for the animals

Rich Adams is riding his push scooter across Canada to bring awareness to the dog meat trade in Asia

Canadian high school science courses behind on climate change, says UBC study

Researchers found performance on key areas varies by province and territory

UPDATE: One dead after house fire in rural Maple Ridge

Dewdney Trunk Road closed, traffic being re-routed

Six inducted into BC Hockey Hall of Fame

The 26th ceremony in Penticton welcomed powerful figures both from on and off the ice

Highway 1 closed near Revelstoke

No estimated time for opening

CRA program to help poor file taxes yields noticeable bump in people helped

Extra money allows volunteer-driven clinics to operate year-round

Recall: Certain Pacific oysters may pose threat of paralytic shellfish poisoning

Consumers urged to either return affected packages or throw them out

How a Kamloops-born man helped put us on the moon

Jim Chamberlin did troubleshooting for the Apollo program, which led to its success

Sexual harassment complaints soaring amid ‘frat boy culture’ in Canada’s airline industry

‘It’s a #MeToo dumpster fire…and it’s exhausting for survivors’

Most Read