Youth group to decide grant awards

Coast Capital launches Fraser Valley Young Leaders Community Council Group that will also address local youth issues

A group of youth will now have huge input into where Coast Capital grants are given.

Coast Capital is creating Young Community Council, all 30 years and younger, who will review grant applications and make funding recommendations on youth issues that need the most support in their communities.

The council consists of four representatives from  the local community and four Coast Capital employees.

The Fraser Valley Young Leaders Community Council follows a successful pilot Council launched in Victoria in early December 2011. To date, the Vancouver Island Council has approved $220,000 in grants to 18 Island organizations – much of it aimed at supporting youth-focused programs and services.

“We were all selected because we care about what’s happening in our communities,” said David Dryden, Chair of the new Fraser Valley Council. “Coast Capital Savings is entrusting us with a huge responsibility by giving us a say in what programs and services to fund in order to do the most good for the most people.”

The Young Leaders Community Council will meet quarterly. Emerging young leaders in the local community and at Coast Capital competed with their peers to be selected for a prestigious term on the Council.

“Coast Capital’s Community Leadership Strategy is aimed at building a richer future for youth in our communities,” said Maureen Young, Coast Capital’s manager for community partnerships and investments. “Who better to decide what young people need than community-minded young leaders? Ultimately, this initiative is about giving back to our communities, but it’s also about realizing the leadership potential of our youth.”

Young said Coast Capital is also launching a similar council for the Metro Vancouver region today. After an initial orientation meeting and training, the new Councils will hold their first meetings in January 2013.

Each year, Coast Capital invests seven per cent of its budgeted pre-tax income in a wide range of community engagement activities, primarily focused on building a richer future for youth. Last year, this commitment amounted to $4.99 million dollars in community support.

To learn more, visit www.coastcapitalsavings.com.

 

 

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