Budding developer creates a Lego-sized White Rock

Max Trest, 8, built the city using recycled materials

One of the youngest developers in White Rock has redesign the city, and elected to use recycled material and Lego to do so.

Max Trest, 8, and his father, Bernard, invited Peace Arch News to their townhouse Friday to see the Lego-sized version of White Rock, which includes the waterfront pier, a passing train, a scaled down version of his family home and the iconic white rock.

Trest, who’s home-schooled on Fridays, was tasked with rebuilding his family house through one of his home learning exercises. However, the budding developer decided to take it a step further, and created a miniature-sized version of the city, which connects to a scaled-down Vancouver by railway and road.

The youngster did not miss details when it came to his project. The 12-foot by seven-foot model, which takes up majority of his family’s livingroom space, includes everything from fishermen on the pier, a Lego man enjoying lunch on a promenade bench, and a replica of the furniture in his house.

Trest, who moved to the city from Hamilton with his family last August, started designing cities when he was five-years-old, he said.

He started building with train sets when he was younger. His parents said the train that passes by White Rock was one of the selling points of the city.

Trest said he cannot track how many miniature cities he’s built over the years, but the most latest completed project was the first time he attempted to replicate an area.

Bernard said they submitted photographs and videos of the project to city hall. A representative from the city responded to the note, telling the youngster that they will show the images to and Mayor Wayne Baldwin and city councillors.

Asked by PAN if he planned on working for White Rock’s planning department in the future, Bernard said that Max has expressed an interest in working for his “favourite city,” New York City.

Trest, who has been to New York, says the next city he wants to visit is Tokyo.

This week, Trest started dismantling parts of the waterfront replica to make room for his latest development, “Cardboard City.”

“I like decorating the cardboard so it doesn’t look like cardboard anymore,” he said of his latest project, which is to include a shoe-box house and a cardboard condominium building.

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