Lindsay McCallum will be recognized for her fundraising efforts by the MS Society of Canada BC and Yukon Division and honoured with a Volunteer Impact in Fund Development Award during the MS Connect conference at the Westin Wall Centre Vancouver Airport on Saturday, Oct. 5. (Photo submitted)

Delta resident up for volunteering award from MS Society

Lindsay McCallum has raised over $36,000 for the society since 2012

A Delta woman is set to receive an award for her work raising money and awareness for people affected by multiple sclerosis.

Since 2012, Lindsay McCallum has been bringing the community together in an annual walk called McCallum’s Miles for MS, with a goal of raising $30,000 in 10 years. This huge endeavour was created to honour her father Victor Ross, who passed away from multiple sclerosis last year.

The event has already surpassed her goal and raised over $36,000.

On Saturday, Oct. 5, McCallum will be recognized for her fundraising efforts by the MS Society of Canada BC and Yukon Division and honoured with a Volunteer Impact in Fund Development Award during that night’s MS Connect conference at the Westin Wall Centre Vancouver Airport.

“Winning this award means that I am making a difference in my community,” McCallum said in a press release. “I would like to continue this annual walk even if I have reached my goal, and continue to get the community involved in raising awareness for MS.”

McCallum will be one of several individuals recognized on Oct. 5 in various award categories for their exceptional efforts in volunteering for the MS community.

“It is important to us that we share the accomplishments and formally recognize our most deserving award winners amongst members of the MS community,” Tania Vrionis, MS Society Alberta-Northwest Territories and BC-Yukon divisions president, said in a press release. “They are all difference makers and are deserving of our most heartfelt thanks.”

According to the MS Society, Canada has one of the highest rates of multiple sclerosis in the world, with 11 Canadians diagnosed with MS every day. MS is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system — the brain, spinal cord and optic nerve. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 40, and the unpredictable effects of the disease last for the rest of their lives.

The MS Society of Canada provides programs and services for people with MS and their families, advocates for those living with MS, and funds research to help improve the quality of life for people living with MS and to ultimately find a cure for this disease. To learn more about MS, head to mssociety.ca.

The MS Connect conference, happening Oct. 5-6, brings together people experiencing MS, health professionals, and researchers from across Canada to discuss and learn about the latest MS research and symptom management developments. The conference features presentations from leading MS researchers, posters from up-and-coming researchers in the MS world, opportunities to engage with experts, and vendors to aid people living with MS with their journey.

To learn more about MS Connect and how to register to attend the conference, visit msconnect.ca or call 1-800-268-7582.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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