Surrey's Pop-Up Junk Drop is accepting your household recyclables.

Drop off your junk

Surrey residents can get rid of household items that can't be put out during regular waste collection.

Due to the popularity of the event, the City of Surrey’s Pop-Up Junk Drop will take place at the Surrey Operations Centre for the rest of the season.

The public is invited to get rid of household items that can’t be put out during regular waste collection four more times until October at 6549 148 St.

The remaining dates for free disposal are Aug. 6 and 27, Sept. 17 and Oct. 1 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Accepted items are:

• Furniture and Mattresses: Couches, chairs, mattresses and other household furniture

• Electronics: Computers, televisions and other household electronics (will be recycled).

• Small Appliances: vacuums, scales, countertop appliances, hair dryers, fans, irons, power tools, sewing machines, typewriters and exercise equipment.

• Appliances and scrap metal: Fridges, freezers, washers, dryers and other large household appliances, as well as scrap metal (will be recycled).

• Household renovation waste: Clean wood (no paint, stains, glues or chemical treatments), sinks, toilets, lumber (clean wood only), pallets that are unpainted, untreated and free of glue (the wood may be pierced with nails or metal fasteners such as screws or staples).

• Other Household Items: Styrofoam, tires (please remove rims), mixed paper (including cardboard), printed paper, cardboard food packaging, mixed plastic (toys, household items, garden furniture, etc), gently used clothes (drop off bins) and infant car seats.

City of Surrey residents can also donate any reusable items that are in good condition. Salvation Army and non-profit agencies will gather items such as gently used clothing and housewares.

Loads of up to one tonne will be accepted.

Unacceptable items are:

• Hazardous construction waste: No asbestos-containing materials, drywall, plaster, joint compound, vinyl flooring, ceiling tiles, vermiculite, old chimney bricks, explosives or ammunition.

• Commercial waste: No dirt, rocks, sand, drywall, concrete, asbestos-containing materials, or unidentified waste from commercial properties.

• Hazardous household waste: No paint, solvents, flammable liquids, gasoline or pesticides.

• Other unaccepted items: No animal waste, animal carcasses, car parts (tires are accepted) or lead-acid batteries.

For information on proper disposal of unaccepted items and to find a disposal facility near you, visit regeneration.ca/ or rcbc.ca/recyclepedia/search or call the recycling hotline at 604-RECYCLE (604-732-9253).

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