Summer is a good time to explore the area's cool

Heritage trees are worth protecting

Surrey has a rich selection of significant trees from around the world.

British Columbia has long been renowned for the quality and size of its trees, and the Lower Mainland once had some of the greatest.

The tallest conifer ever measured by a B.C. forester was a 1,100-year-old Douglas-fir felled in 1881 near Hall’s Prairie; its fallen trunk was 109.1 metres long and the stump was 3.5 metres across.

Although the early days of logging soon cleared most of the upland forests, an old-growth stump at Surrey Centre, measured in 1947, was three metres in diameter.

Forests grow quickly in our moist, coastal climate, and even as second growth, the remaining cedars, hemlocks and Douglas firs are magnificent trees, enormously tall by global standards. They will need to be allowed to grow for a few hundred years more to approach the maturity and richness of the forest they replaced. Some beautiful trees can still be found locally, although many are still cut down to make way for developments.

Anne MurraySummer is a good time to explore our cool, dark forests, and thanks to the efforts of early conservationists, many local parks have magnificent trees, including Elgin, Tynehead, Redwood, and Green Timbers Park and Urban Forest. Efforts were made to protect Green Timbers as early as 1860, yet despite the fame of its giant trees and their attraction to tourists, the last virgin stand of timber was felled by 1930. How short-sighted that was. The park was replanted with native conifers and the work of restoration continues today with the work of the Green Timbers Heritage Society.

Besides native conifers, Surrey has a rich selection of heritage trees from around the world. A heritage tree can be defined as one that is old, large and/or has important cultural significance. Redwood Park has the largest stand of Giant Sequoias north of the international border, as well as English Walnut, Sweet Chestnut, English Oak, Golden Elm and other unusual trees planted by the Brown Brothers from 1893 onwards.

Darts Hill Garden is a designated Heritage Tree Site with fine specimens of many interesting trees, including Antarctic Beech, Bigleaf Magnolia and White Mulberry. It is open to group tours, by arrangement.

A great source of information on local heritage trees is “Our Sylvan Heritage ~ A Guide to the Magnificent Trees of the South Fraser”, by Susan Murray (no relation). Susan is a third-generation horticulturist and founder of the Fraser Valley Heritage Tree Society.

Anne Murray is a local naturalist and author of A Nature Guide to Boundary Bay and Tracing Our Past ~ A Heritage Guide to Boundary Bay, see www.natureguidesbc.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Surrey North Delta Leader

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Surrey bus driver tests positive for COVID-19

Routes he drove have not been disclosed

Surrey mayor denies property tax deferral motion

Councillor’s notice of motion for Surrey property taxes to be deferred until Dec. 2 out of order

Team refunds OK’d for cancelled Surrey Mayor’s Cup soccer tournament

The decision follows the amalgamation of the Central City Breakers club with Surrey Football Club

COVID-19: 4 new deaths, 25 new cases but only in Vancouver Coastal, Fraser Health

A total of 1,291 people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: Don’t get away for Easter weekend, Dr. Bonnie Henry warns

John Horgan, Adrian Dix call 130 faith leaders as holidays approach

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

RCMP call on kids to name latest foal recruits

The baby horses names are to start with the letter ‘S’

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

B.C. wide burning restrictions come into effect April 16

‘Larger open burns pose an unnecessary risk and could detract from wildfire detection’

B.C. secures motel, hotel rooms for COVID-19 shelter space

Community centres, rooms reserved for pandemic self-isolation

Most Read