Cloverdale author J.A. Louvel’s second novel, the sequel to New Eden, will be released in November 2019. (Samantha Anderson)

Cloverdale author J.A. Louvel’s second novel, the sequel to New Eden, will be released in November 2019. (Samantha Anderson)

Labour of love as Cloverdale author closes second chapter of sci-fi trilogy

Local writer didn’t always have the confidence to practice her craft

When you listen to Cloverdale author Jasing Louvel talk about her writing, it seems as if she always knew she would one day become a novelist.

Louvel writes every day — it’s a full-time job — and becomes so immersed in her craft that she has to be careful to remember to take breaks to eat and rest.

But to get to where she is today, to become confident enough in her work to call herself a writer, took a great deal of time.

“I always knew I wanted to write. Maybe not as a kid, but as a teen,” she told the Reporter. “But I also knew that wasn’t something I could do.”

“I had the desire but I didn’t believe I had the ability. I didn’t have the confidence. It was something other people did,” Louvel explained. “Other people went to the Olympics. Other people cured strange diseases. Other people wrote books.”

As she struggled with her longing to write, Louvel became an avid reader. She read everything, and a lot of it.

But “even as I’m reading, there’s a nagging voice in my head — ‘you need to write a book.’”

It wasn’t until she learned to draw, years later, that she would discover the confidence she needed to pursue the art of writing.

SEE ALSO: From pipes to pen

SEE ALSO: Cloverdale man pens ‘tail’ on family dog

“After I learned to draw, something that I never thought I’d be able to do, I thought, ‘Hey, if I can do that, I can write.’”

She told herself, “You either write the book, or you never ever think about writing a book.”

So she sat down and wrote. It wasn’t easy — for a year, nothing she wrote made it past the first page. She went through ideas, experimented with different genres, tested out dialogue and scene.

“Then I thought — sci-fi. My brain just went crazy. The possibilities were endless,” she said. An avid science fiction reader herself, it was the perfect fit for her. “I wanted to write a book that I would want to read. At that time I was reading a lot of sci-fi, dystopian fiction.”

“I asked myself what would it take in our civilized world for the people around me —who are often kind, and co-operative and civic-minded people, thoughtful people — what would it take to create a kind of deep division between peoples that allowed us to accept a dystopian society. What would it take? That was my jumping off point.”

With that leap, she was off. She couldn’t write fast enough. Louvel, the Reporter discovered, has the enviable quality of not suffering from writer’s block. “I had to become very disciplined about, not [starting to] write, but stopping.”

“What I do suffer from,” she laughed, “is punctuation block.”

It quickly became clear that the book she had embarked on would need to be split into a trilogy.

“It started out as a big fat book and then it got fatter. And then I thought, I think I need to make it into two [books]. And then I went to make it two, and I knew, ‘It needs to be three,’” she said with a chuckle.

“It just evolved.”

The Joining Trilogy is a social sci-fi that “explores the appalling effects of an ancient legacy passed down for hundreds of generations,” one that has created “a society that lives by rules alone without compassion or love. And yet, sometimes, love finds a way,” said Louvel.

The first in the series, titled New Eden, follows five unusual people on the brutal planet of New Eden, a place where weakness is not tolerated. As their paths cross, some gain power and others are left disgraced. When all seems hopeless, two strangers appear with what might be the solution to a society without love.

New Eden, the culmination of decades of work, was published in 2017, and is available on amazon.ca as an e-book and a paperback. Holding a physical copy of the book in her hands for the first time was a “surreal” experience, she said.

“It was wonderful. I left my body a little bit.”

New Eden is both light and dark at turns, she said. “Book two is darker and lighter.”

The next in the series, Progeny, is expected to be released in mid-November.

For more information on the upcoming publishing date, visit thejoiningtrilogy.com.



editor@cloverdalereporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Councillor Doug Elford. (File photo: Amy Reid)
Elford to join Surrey Homelessness and Housing Society as a director

Fellow Safe Surrey Coalition Councillors Laurie Guerra, Mandeep Nagra and Allison Patton will be re-appointed to the board

(Photo: Tom Zytaruk)
Surrey council moves to reduce parking along rapid transit corridors

This also targets rental housing developments in Rapid Transit Areas

Big Splash water park is located in Tsawwassen. (submitted photo)
Big Splash reopens Canada Day with changes to keep the water park ‘safe for everyone’

Executive Hotels & Resorts has owned and operated the attraction since 2017

A cyclist stops traffic to allow a gaggle of geese cross the road. (Tino Fluckiger photo)
White Rock man asks motorists to be mindful of wildlife after close call

Impatient motorists drives into oncoming traffic

Elgin Park Secondary students rally for climate change outside of their South Surrey in 2019. (Nick Greenizan photo)
City of Surrey set to host online climate-action panel

June 23 Zoom event to include speakers, question-and-answer period

Maxwell Johnson is seen in Bella Bella, B.C., in an undated photo. The Indigenous man from British Columbia has filed complaints with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal and the Canadian Human Rights Commission after he and his granddaughter were handcuffed when they tried to open a bank account. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Heiltsuk Nation, Damien Gillis, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
VIDEO: Chiefs join human rights case of Indigenous man handcuffed by police in B.C. bank

Maxwell Johnson said he wants change, not just words, from Vancouver police

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Chief Rosanne Casimir stands outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School after speaking to reporters, in Kamloops, B.C., on Friday, June 4, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Kamloops chief says more unmarked graves will be found across Canada

Chief Rosanne Casimir told a virtual news conference the nation expects to release a report at the end of June

A woman wears a vaccinated sticker after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. ranks among highest in world in COVID-19 first-dose shots: health officials

More than 76% of eligible people have received their 1st shot

A screenshot of the First Peoples Cultural Councils First Peoples’ Map. (First Peoples Cultural Council)
Online resource blends B.C.-Alberta’s Indigenous languages, art and culture

Advisor says initiative supports the urgent need to preserve Indigenous languages

An artists conception of the new terminal building at the Pitt Meadows Regional Airport.
Air travel taking off in B.C., but lack of traffic controllers a sky-high concern

There will be demand for more air traffic controllers: Miller

Canadian Armed Forces experts are on their way to North Vancouver after a local homeowner expressed worry about a military artifact he recently purchased. (Twitter DNV Fire and Rescue)
Military called in to deal with antique ‘shell’ at North Vancouver home

‘The person somehow purchased a bombshell innocently believing it was an out-of-commission military artifact’

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz have set their wedding date for February, hoping that more COVID-19 restrictions will have lifted. (The Macleans)
B.C. couples ‘gambling’ on whether COVID rules will let them dance at their wedding

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz pushed back their wedding in hopes of being able to celebrate it without the constraints of COVID-19

A plane is silhouetted as it takes off from Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., May 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Report calls for airlines to refund passengers for flights halted due to COVID-19

Conclusion: federal help should be on the condition airlines immediately refund Canadian travellers

Green party Leader Annamie Paul speaks during a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Paul has survived another day of party strife after a planned ouster shifted course, leaving her with a tenuous grip on power ahead of a likely federal election this year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Green Leader Annamie Paul blasts ‘racist,’ ‘sexist’ party execs who sought ouster

Fallout has continued, with two of the federal council’s members resigning

Most Read