‘Noticeable reduction’ to invasive species on White Rock’s West Beach

The Lower Mainland Green Team, joined by more than two dozen community volunteers, removed six cubic metres from White Rock’s West Beach on May 14, 2022. (Contributed photo)The Lower Mainland Green Team, joined by more than two dozen community volunteers, removed six cubic metres from White Rock’s West Beach on May 14, 2022. (Contributed photo)
The Lower Mainland Green Team, joined by more than two dozen community volunteers, removed six cubic metres from White Rock’s West Beach on May 14, 2022. (Contributed photo)The Lower Mainland Green Team, joined by more than two dozen community volunteers, removed six cubic metres from White Rock’s West Beach on May 14, 2022. (Contributed photo)
The Lower Mainland Green Team, joined by more than two dozen community volunteers, removed six cubic metres from White Rock’s West Beach on May 14, 2022. (Contributed photo)The Lower Mainland Green Team, joined by more than two dozen community volunteers, removed six cubic metres from White Rock’s West Beach on May 14, 2022. (Contributed photo)

A section of White Rock’s waterfront has decidedly less Himalayan blackberry clogging up its dunes, following an effort Saturday (May 14) organized by the Lower Mainland Green Team.

Program manager Ashton Kerr said an invite for community members to help remove the invasive from West Beach led to the clearing of six cubic metres of the prickly and aggressive plant – including dozens of stubborn roots.

“Despite some on and off rain, 29 incredible community members of all ages, backgrounds and experience levels joined us at this activity and gave it their all,” Kerr writes in an update emailed to Peace Arch News.

READ MORE: Green Team returning to tackle invasive plants on White Rock’s waterfront

The visit was the team’s fourth since May of last year, and the effort has resulted in a noticeable reduction in the amount of Himalayan blackberry, she continued.

“Notably, some areas of the dunes had no regrowth of blackberry at all, proving that our hard work digging up blackberry roots is worth it! As with the restoration of any site, West Beach is an ongoing effort that we will continue to visit, but a worthwhile one at that!”

The cleanup was run in partnership with the City of White Rock and the team’s charity, Green Teams of Canada.

Kerr described it as an opportunity “for the community to come together and make a difference, while fostering a sense of belonging and connection to nature.”



tholmes@peacearchnews.com
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