Peace Arch Hospice Society executive director Amanda McNally. (Contributed photo)

Peace Arch Hospice Society executive director Amanda McNally. (Contributed photo)

Peace Arch Hospice Society names new executive director

Amanda McNally to replace retiring Beth Kish

The Peace Arch Hospice Society has a new executive director.

Following the retirement of executive director Beth Kish, the hospice announced Nov. 13 that Amanda McNally will fill her shoes.

“We would like to take this time to extend our deep appreciation and thanks to our retiring Executive Director, Beth Kish, for her exceptional leadership and support over the past six years,” said a news release from the hospice society. “Our organization has grown significantly and became stronger thanks to Beth’s commitment to our mission, vision, and values. She has touched the lives of so many people in our community, and we will be forever grateful to Beth for her many achievements.”

McNally, an Ocean Park resident, spent 10 years working for the Canadian Cancer Society. Her work at the society involved peer support, program management and annual giving.

“I am thrilled to have the opportunity to be part of an organization that provides support and much-needed programs and services to members in our community,” McNally said in the release. “I am also looking forward to getting to know our incredible volunteers and supporters.”

Hospice president Jayne Pattison said the board of directors has the utmost confidence in McNally.

“We are excited to work with Amanda and wish her much success,” Pattison said in the release.

Peace Arch Hospital Society is a volunteer-based non-profit organization dedicated to supporting people who are on an end-of-life journey and to those who are grieving the loss of a loved one.

People in need of palliative or grief support can call 604-531-7484 or visit peacearchhospice.org

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