PHOTOS: Nature walk, invasive-plant removal highlights busy Saturday for Green Team

Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)
Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)Led by the Lower Mainland Green Team and City of White Rock parks manager Egan Davis, about a dozen local residents took part in an interpretive nature walk at Ruth Johnson Park. The walk was followed by a few hours of invasive plant removal. (Lower Mainland Green Team photo)

A small group of nature lovers gathered at White Rock’s Ruth Johnson Park Saturday morning, for an interpretive nature walk led by Lower Mainland Green Team’s Ashton Kerr and City of White Rock’s Egan Davis.

About a dozen community members took part in the walk, according to organizers, and learned about “the geological and Indigenous history of the area, the plant community in the forest… and benefits of this urban forest (and) threats to this ecosystem.”

Following the walk, 14 volunteers removed a variety of invasive plants from the park, including Himalayan blackberry, English ivy, English holly and Portuguese and English laurel. In total, 11.5 cubic metres of plants were removed – the equivalent of 72 bath tubs full, Kerr noted.

Saturday’s event was well-timed; though it was still a blustery, chilly fall day, both the walk and invasive species removal came a day before the arrival of a massive West Coast storm that is expected to bring continued heavy rain and wind to regions stretching from northern Vancouver Island south to Northern California.

The Green Team will be back at the park Wednesday (Oct. 27) where they will work with 75 South Surrey students, from Grades 4-11, to remove more invasive plants. The event is likely to be the Green Team’s last event of the fall locally, but they expect to return in the spring.



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