Mr. and Mrs. Bose enjoy a boat ride on the Serpentine River

River exhibit flows through Surrey Museum

Every River Tells a Story celebrates local waterways and their history.

The Surrey Museum’s new feature exhibit, Every River Tells A Story, celebrates the rivers of Surrey, from the mighty Fraser River to the winding Serpentine and Nicomekl, to the smaller Campbell River.

The exhibit, on display until Dec. 20, features oral histories, fun interactives, personal stories, and information about what river advocates are doing now to keep Surrey’s waterways safe and clean.

“In recent years the sprawl of development has begun to change the face of land south of the Fraser River,” says Dr. Barry Leach, Serpentine Fen preservation advocate. “This whole area of the Fraser Delta from Surrey to Reifel Island in Delta has the highest density of wintering waterfowl, shore birds, and raptors in all of Canada.”

The display includes:

▶ Narratives from early Surrey settlers and historical figures like First Nations Chief Staquist and Sir James Douglas tell how rivers were essential to survival in the past.

▶ Modern accounts from river workers and environmental advocates like Rick Hansen tell why these rivers are still important to Surrey, and reflect on how our waterways have shaped the City’s identity.

▶  Stories, interactive displays, and images from local artists and photographers. View stunning digital photography provided by Sullivan Heights Secondary School Fine Arts students and add your own river story to the database kiosk. Stay on course with a real ship’s wheel and compass, and guess the different things people do on Surrey’s rivers.

Learn how steam paddle wheelers and ferries plied the waters of the Fraser, providing essential connections between people, goods and markets between Surrey and New Westminster. See how huge ships bring cargo up the river to Fraser Surrey Docks today, and learn from the captain of a modern dredger about the millions of tons of soil that his ship brings up each year.

The museum is located at 17710 56A Ave. Admission is sponsored by the Friends of the Surrey Museum. For more info, call 604-592-6956 or visit www.surrey.ca/heritage

Surrey North Delta Leader

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