One of the more chilling shots in a video full of them, produced for an all-in cost of $1,200. (Submitted photo)

Chilliwack hip-hop artist Jvck Wilde produces She Devil music video

Dark, chilling and very cinematic, Wilde produces a gripping video on a tight budget

A Chilliwack man has proven it’s possible to shoot a professional-level music video on a tight budget, and Jvck Wilde (real name Brandon Storey) hopes ‘She Devil’ marks a big step in his music career.

Wilde is an up-and-coming hip-hop artist with five songs to his credit.

She Devil is his latest, diving into “the labyrinth of the artist’s mind.”

“She Devil takes place in the middle of Jvck’s journey, where he finds himself unable to confront his demons,” Wilde explains. “He is in a hectic state of mind, heavily trapped by anxiety and paranoia to the point where they have taken shape in the form of a witch, whose sole purpose is to inflict fear within him.”

The music video is two minutes and 47 seconds long, and starts with him emerging from a one-vehicle crash in a forest setting.

Video of him stumbling away is interspersed with quick cuts to the She Devil, still inside the vehicle.

Eventually, Wilde is on his hands and knees, dragging himself away with his tormentor in pursuit. A chilling shot sees Wilde with his back against a tree, with the clawed hand of the She Devil in the foreground.

“Because the music video is from Jvck’s perspective, the storyline is erratic and unreliable, leaving the audience unsure of which events have occurred and which are only a figment of his imagination,” Wilde said.

READ MORE: Chilliwack band Fear The Wolves records music video, songs amid COVID-19 pandemic

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We’ll leave the final shots for you to view, but the video is a cinematic experience.

Wilde envisions it as the first in a series of videos that will form one continuous story and delve into his struggles with mental illness.

“The longest process was pre-production which took me about five months of planning,” said Wilde, who has performed at the Red Room in Vancouver and worked as an Audio Engineer at Studio 710. “It was a one day shoot. Editing was a two week turn around. I’d say the most difficult part was finding the right people and planning the shots. Once that was in place, It was relatively smooth. I was fortunate to have such a great team around me.”

The video ended up costing $1,200 including gas, catering, cinematography, makeup, props, costumes, equipment and editing.

“In terms of play, I’m hoping we can get on local radio as well as national,” Wilde said. “The plan is to showcase my own skills as well as the skills from other local artists. Chilliwack is filled with so much talent and I want to encourage everyone to take a leap of faith with it.”


@ProgressSports
eric.welsh@theprogress.com

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