Flute ensemble returning to North Delta’s Firehall Centre for the Arts

On Sunday, Nov. 20, the 11-piece Fluterrific will perform a variety of music ranging from classical to Celtic to Latin to Broadway.

Eleven-peice flute ensemble Fluterrific plays the Firehall Centre for the Arts on Nov. 20. (From left: Leslie McDougall

Following sold out performances in back-to-back years, local flute ensemble Fluterrific is returning for its third annual concert at North Delta’s Firehall Centre for the Arts.

On Sunday, Nov. 20, the 11-piece band will perform a variety of music ranging from classical to Celtic to Latin to Broadway on nine different instruments, with a few surprises thrown in for good measure.

“This 3rd annual concert has become our focal point for the year. We’re pulling out all the stops to bring the most entertaining and mixed program we can,” said band leader Michelle Carlisle, who founded the group in the early 2000s. “The Firehall is a cozy, intimate venue, perfect for such a concert. Audience members can be close to the musicians and even participate in a bit of trivia throughout the show.”

Carlisle, who has played the flute for 35 years and is a part of seven bands or ensembles, said concerts in the community are always a positive experience.

“North Delta is like a small town nestled in a big city (Greater Vancouver). It reminds me of my small Saskatchewan hometown, a warm and welcoming place. Shows like this prove support for the arts, local musicians and business people making a living here.”

The Fluterrific ensemble concert Nov. 20 at the Firehall Centre for the Arts features a variety of flutes, including C flutes, bass flutes, alto flutes, piccolos.

The Fluterrific ensemble concert Nov. 20 at the Firehall Centre for the Arts features a variety of flutes, including C flutes, bass flutes, alto flutes, piccolos. Photo credit: Michelle Carlisle

Flutes have a long tradition. The oldest ones unearthed were created from bones thousands of years ago and were used in hunting and magic rituals. During the 16th century, the use of wood or bamboo morphed them into the modern flute and, over time, more and more keys were added to enhance both sound and tuning.

“The flute is an extension of myself,” Carlisle said. “I sing without words; I soar with a melody; play a fast jig or reel; delight audiences who want to tap their toes. I play music from multiple areas of the world, and different eras of our history, all with one instrument.”

In addition to teaching kids how to play, Carlisle thrives by creating arrangements for her ensembles.

“Each year, at this concert, we do one piece I’ve written. It is a treat to hear my music played by such a fine collection of flute players. This time the tune is ‘On the Up and Up,’” Carlisle said. “I share the melody among performers. The audience hears melodies pop in and out of different parts of the group.”

The concert starts at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door or in advance by calling 604-596-4485. Kids 10 and under free.

 

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