THREE THINGS TO DO: ‘Boeing Boeing’ comedy about bachelor set to soar

Also: Oscar-night parties in Surrey, plus handcrafted ceramics at art gallery

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1. In White Rock, the silliness promises to soar a mile high in “Boeing Boeing,” the latest comedy staged at Coast Capital Playhouse. Playwright Marc Camoletti’s ’60s-era tale, about a jet-setting bachelor and the many female flight attendants he brings to his stylish Paris apartment, hits the stage for two-plus weeks starting Wednesday, March 2. Directed by Ryan Mooney and produced by Josh Fuller, the show stars Alexander Morris, Stefanie Colliar, Kirstin Shale, Robert Feher, Tegan Verheul and Robyn Bradley. The director and cast will be in the house to answer questions from the audience during two “Talkback Thursday” nights, on March 10 and 17. Ticket details are posted at Whiterockplayers.ca, or call the box office at 604-536-7533.

2. Walk a red carpet for an Oscar Awards Party staged Sunday evening (Feb. 28) by Royal Canadian Theatre Company. At the Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel, the fun includes prizes, a silent auction, cash bar, and watching the Academy Awards show on giant TV screens, all as a fundraiser for the Surrey-based theatre company (details at Rctheatreco.com/oscar-tickets.htm). Elsewhere, Surrey Hospice Society will host a similar event as a fundraiser at Edith + Arthur pub in Fleetwood (tickets are $25 via 604-584-7006).

3. Laura Wee Lay Laq’s burnished and sawdust-fired vessels have been shown locally, nationally and internationally. On March 3, she’ll talk about her ceramic art as part of the next Thursday Artist Talk series event at Surrey Art Gallery, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. She’ll talk about working with clay and show examples of her hand-built pots made without glazes or a potter’s wheel. “To take earth, give it personal expression, smooth it with a stone, give it to the fire, changing it from earth to stone, then embedding the clay into the dust of trees and making it vulnerable to the natural elements, completes a cycle – a cycle in which I am proud to play a part,” says Wee Lay Laq, whose website is Mmarkham.com/LauraWeeLayLaq.html. For details about the event at SAG, call 604-501-5566. Event admission is free.

tom.zillich@thenownewspaper.com

 

 

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