THREE THINGS TO DO: ‘Spooktacular Newton’ event returns Saturday

Also this week: A special dinner at Ukrainian Orthodox Cultural Centre and a new-look Kids Gallery at Surrey Museum

A scene from last year's 'Spooktacular Newton” event.

1. Last year’s inaugural “Spooktacular Newton” was a spooky hoot, and it’s happening again this Saturday (Oct. 22) from noon to 4 p.m. at 7327 137 St., Surrey. Newton Business Improvement Association’s Halloween event, held in partnership with Envision Financial, includes many free and fun activities in an “urban pumpkin patch” environment, with 1,000 pumpkins “free” for the taking with a donation to Surrey Food Bank. The event will include a petting zoo, a Spook Theatre, haunted train rides, photo booth, trick-or-treating, games, crafts and facepainting. For more event details, visit Newtonbia.com.

2. A dinner and concert on Saturday (Oct. 22) will celebrate 125 years of Ukrainian immigration to Canada, at the Ukrainian Orthodox Cultural Centre, 13512 108th Ave., Whalley. “We are trying to reach out to all those second and third generations who have parents and grandparents who immigrated to Canada but have lost touch with their roots but would be interested in having  an opportunity to participate and learn something of their culture,” event co-ordinator Katherine Miske told the Now. Event tickets are $30 per person by calling 778-292-0239. Event details are posted at Uocstmarysurrey.com, under Upcoming Events.

(LIST CONTINUES BELOW)

3. New food-focused interactive displays are featured in the recently revamped Kids Gallery at Surrey Museum, with info about where food comes from and how it impacts the environment. The gallery, which opened a year ago, features a tree house, a play farm house, a pipe wall and many other “interactives” designed to keep children of all ages engaged as they learn. “We expect the play garden to be a great addition for toddlers,” said Lynn Saffery, museum manager. “They can plant wooden carrots and other veggies while their older siblings take in the interactive on another level, learning about the environmental impact of greenhouses versus farmer fields.” Look for more gallery info at Surrey.ca/heritage, or call 604-592-6956.

tom.zillich@thenownewspaper.com

 

Just Posted

The struggle for space inside Surrey’s elementary schools

SECOND IN A SERIES: A look at how overcrowding impacts student life

VIDEO: 5X Festival takes over Surrey’s Central City plaza

Second annual event draws thousands of people throughout the day

City shifts proposed transit station to King George after cancellation of LRT

Council to consider Newton Town Centre plan in fall

VIDEO: Plane makes forced landing on Highway 17 in Surrey

Police say no one was injured and no damage to aircraft or vehicles

Nearly 200 motorcycles take off from Cloverdale for Brenden’s Ride

Annual fundraiser supports programs that empower people with disabilities

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Pride flag taken down by Township of Langley

Woman said she was told it was removed from her front yard because of a complaint

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read