Canadians have an obligation to support veterans: Poll

Remembrance Day survey examines challenges facing men and women after service in the Canadian Armed Forces.

An annual Nanos national survey released today by Commissionaires demonstrates overwhelming public support for veterans as they make the transition from military life to a civilian career.

For the second consecutive year, 94 per cent of those surveyed continue to believe that Canadians have an obligation to ensure our veterans find meaningful employment after they’ve finished their service in the Canadian Armed Forces.

“Canadians clearly feel strongly that vets deserve our support, during and after their military service,” noted Bill Sutherland, national board chair of the Commissionaires.  “We’ve been hiring vets since 1925, so we know just how highly skilled and talented they are.”

The survey also indicates that 72 per cent of Canadians believe that in the last five years, veterans have faced difficulties making the transition to civilian jobs. In fact, 54 per cent of respondents believe it is more difficult for today’s veterans to find civilian jobs than it was for veterans of the first and second world wars. As well, nearly 70 per cent of respondents believe that the skills of today’s veterans are relevant and transferable.

Respondents in B.C. showed slightly stronger support for vets than in some other regions of the country, with nearly 96 per cent believing Canadians have an obligation to ensure vets find meaningful employment. The national average was 94 per cent. As well, British Columbians believed more strongly than Canadians in general that veterans have had a difficult time finding jobs after leaving the Canadian Armed Forces (78 per cent versus the national average of 72 per cent).

Finally, the national survey revealed that 81 per cent of Canadians think first of veterans of the First and Second World Wars on Remembrance Day, rather than veterans of more recent conflicts.

“Veterans from all walks of life have given of themselves to defend Canada’s interests and promote peace abroad. We owe them a debt of gratitude and the support they need to secure their post-military career,” said Dan Popowich, CEO, Commissionaires British Columbia.

Since 1925, Commissionaires has been providing meaningful employment for veterans as they make the transition from the Canadian Armed Forces to civilian life. With 16 divisions and more than 20,000 men and women employed across the country, Commissionaires is a leading national provider of security services, and one of the largest employers of veterans in Canada.

The Nanos survey was conducted between Aug. 18 and 22 with a sample size of 1,000 Canadians. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

 

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