John Clark of Surrey’s Carillon Music Academy, has developed a tier of programs for younger students, working with ear development that happens between the ages of three and eight.

Tickling the ivories to boost the brain

Music lessons give kids a leg-up in life

As the beginning of the school year draws ever closer, it’s time again to think about signing up for extra-curricular activities to keep your little ones active and engaged.

Learning to play a musical instrument is one of the most valuable gifts you can give your child. Music is not only therapeutic, but studies show playing music is beneficial to your mental, physical, and emotional health. For those who start playing at a very young age, these benefits are exponential. From better academic performance in school to improved overall confidence, music lessons are the gift that keeps on giving.

The developing mind is particularly capable of reaping the many cognitive rewards that immersing yourself in music delivers.

Just ask John Clark of Carillon Music Academy in Surrey, BC. Since 1970, this independently owned, family-run institution has been shaping young minds through a unique array of programs designed specifically for the early beginner.

While most traditional piano lessons typically start around age eight – when a child is able to read – Carillon Music Academy has developed a tier of programs that begin music training at a much younger age.

“Between the ages of three and eight is when most ear development takes place,” says Clark. “After that the ear starts shutting down as we age. Learning to play music goes along with language development, so it makes sense to teach young children to play while the ear is still developing.”

Carillon Music Academy offers piano lessons for children as young as four years of age. The early childhood piano programs provide a fun environment for children and caregivers to develop their music skills. Focusing on group activities, teacher-led classes include singing, rhythm ensembles, learning games and classroom activities. Rhythm development, ear training, note-reading, music theory and piano performance are incorporated into the lessons.

Caregiver participation is key in these beginner courses. Not only is it encouraging for children to see adults benefiting from the magic of music, it gives caregivers a fantastic knowledge base for facilitating home practice, which is essential for student success.

Carillon Music Academy’s early childhood programs teach both ear training and traditional note reading. They also offer private lessons to students aged eight to adult. Because Carillon programs coincide with the school year, providing a weekly, one hour lesson starting in September and running through June, it is really important to get your child back at the piano bench as soon it’s time to get back to the books.

“We’ve found that if a student misses those first few weeks in September, it is almost impossible to catch up,” says Clark.

Offering piano, voice and guitar lessons, Carillon Music Academy provides a music education to last a lifetime.

You can register for September music lessons today.

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