When it comes to Daylight Saving Time, losing an hour of sleep is the least of your worries, say some experts. (Unsplash)

When it comes to Daylight Saving Time, losing an hour of sleep is the least of your worries, say some experts. (Unsplash)

B.C. MLA fights to abolish Daylight Saving Time

MLA Linda Larson says the time jumps impact British Columbians’ productivity, safety and health

As B.C. residents prepare to roll their clocks ahead this weekend, a B.C. MLA continues her dedicated fight to end Daylight Saving Time across the province.

Boundary–Similkameen MLA Linda Larson is preparing to re-introduce Bill M201 for a third time – calling on the legislature to end to the practice of changing the clock twice each year.

Daylight saving is just around the corner. Sunday, March 10 at 3 a.m. is the moment British Columbians lose an hour of sleep and “spring forward” into longer days.

RELATED: BC MLA wants to abolish Daylight Saving Time

But Larson said most of the Bill M201 supporters are happy with the “spring forward” savings and want to keep the time in that “forward” mode.

“The daylight saving time is the time people want – they want the extra daylight in the summer months,” Larson said. “People are more interested in the light in the nicer months than they are in the winter months.”

When asked how she feels about more darkness in the winter, Larson says it wouldn’t be a big change.

“Let’s face it, this is something we already deal with. It’s nothing new. I don’t believe it’s an issue.”

RELATED: Save power after Daylight Saving

Larson’s introduction of the bill came after her constituent city, Grand Forks brought forth – and passed – a motion at the Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) to end Daylight Saving Time.

She says impacts on productivity, safety and general health have been well documented.

“The necessity to do [Daylight Saving Time] is no longer there. It was done very specifically more than 100 years ago for a purpose … and we no longer need to do the switching.”

And there is support for Larson’s concerns.

Bahareh Ezzati, a respiratory therapist with CanSleep Services, says losing an hour of sleep each spring can put pressure on a person’s cardiovascular system, which can have devastating consequences for people with pre-existing heart conditions.

RELATED: Daylight savings contributes to sleep deprivation: professors

“The main thing is that you get in a routine and now that routine has changed and your body doesn’t know why it is happening,” Ezzati said. “We do adapt, but at a cost. [Recovery] takes a few days to a few weeks, and that would make people very tired and increases the risk of motor vehicle accidents.”

Larson isn’t confident that the bill will pass this year, but she doesn’t plan on giving up.

“I will put it on the table with great hope as I always do, and as the session ends it will fall off again,” she said. “At some point, I think it is something that will be dealt with, and I’m hoping there will be a government bold enough to do it.”

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