Don Putt, now 70, was convicted of child luring after being busted by the anti-pedophile group Creep Catchers at a Chilliwack McDonald’s in October 2016. He also sexually assaulted two boys in Agassiz in the 1980s, and is out on statutory release on Jan. 15, 2020. (YouTube)

Chilliwack man who sexually assaulted young boys released from prison

Statutory release for Don Putt who Parole Board calls an ‘untreated sex offender’

An untreated sex offender from Chilliwack who was sentenced in 2017 to prison time for sexually assaulting young boys in the 1980s is no longer behind bars as of Wednesday night.

Having been sentenced to four years in jail on Oct. 19, 2017, Donald Putt’s statutory release date was Jan. 16, 2020. Before midnight on Jan. 15 he was transferred to some sort of residential facility or home in Surrey approved by the Correctional Service of Canada before midnight on Jan. 15, 2020, according to a source.

• READ MORE: Chilliwack man sentenced to four years for sexually assaulting teen brothers in the 1980s

Putt befriended neighbours in Agassiz in the 1980s, and groomed their two boys inflicting years of trauma on the two victims, men now in their 40s.

The case was high profile as it stemmed from another conviction that came about after a Creep Catchers’ sting at the Vedder Crossing Mcdonald’s in 2016. He received a six-month sentence for that crime as the thought he was meeting a 12-year-old boy.

• READ MORE: Chilliwack Creep Catchers target afraid for his safety if sent to federal prison

But the 70-year-old won’t be allowed to go anywhere near his two adult victims, nor will he be allowed to come anywhere near the communities where he offended, according to the Parole Board of Canada decision obtained by The Progress.

As part of a long list of conditions, Putt is banned from entering the eastern Fraser Valley, specifically the cities of Chilliwack, Agassiz or Abbotsford. He is also not allowed to enter Vernon, Vancouver Island, the Okanagan/Shuswap area or the North Okanagan, without prior written permission from a parole supervisor.

And while a Parole Board spokesperson declined to say what community he will be living in, one of his victim’s said it’s Surrey.

Statutory release is a standard practice under Canadian law, which means federal offenders are released from prison under Correctional Service of Canada supervision after serving two-thirds of sentences.

After pleading guilty to 15 to 20 illegal acts with each boy, a tiny fraction of what he really did, according to his victims, he was sentenced to the four years given credit for time served.

One victim is not impressed with the sentence and that he is now out of prison.

“It is difficult to accept that this is what Canada believes to be reasonable recompense for the deviant crimes of this manipulative predator,” he told The Progress.

In the Parole Board decision, Putt was told that his two objections to special conditions were dismissed. Specifically, Putt objected to being ordered to reside at a specific place, and to not own, use or possess a computer as defined by the criminal code.

In rejecting the condition that he reside at a specific place, the Board considered his convictions, victim impact statements, psychological risk assessments, and the absence of programming taken to address those risks, among other things.

“You are an ‘untreated sex offender who continues to deny sexual interest in underage males despite a recent offence to the contrary.’”

Further, the Board found that Putt’s request to live in a facility in the Okanagan does not address the specific risk he presents to society.

“You have a history of this behaviour stretching back over 40 years, and you continue to minimize and deny your offending in spite of a conviction for similar behaviour in 2016.”

Putt’s victim agrees with the Board’s decision regarding his risk to society.

“I am firm in my belief that as long as he is breathing he will pose an unreasonable danger to children and young boys,” he said.

Putt is also not allow to purchase or possess pornography. He is not allowed to be in the presence of anyone under the age of 18, unless accompanied by a responsible adult who knows his criminal history and who has been approved in writing. He is also not allowed to own more than one communication device or SIM card, and he is forbidden from being near places where children are likely to be present, such as schools, parks or pools.


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

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