Patty Hadju, federal minister of employment, at a 2018 announcement for the Canada Summer Jobs program in South Surrey. (Nick Greenizan)

UPDATE: Deadline extended for summer job applications

Cloverdale, Langley employers can still apply for funding until Feb. 3

UPDATE:

The deadline for employers to get their applications in for the Canada Summer Jobs program has been extended by nine days.

Canada Summer Jobs Program gives tens of thousands of young Canadians the chance to gain skills and valuable work experience, which will help them start a meaningful career.

And now there’s more time to get the applications in, annoucned employment minister Patty Hajdu.

To ensure young Canadians have as many good quality summer job opportunities as possible, the employer application period for the 2019 Canada Summer Job (CSJ) program is extended until Feb. 3.

•••••

Employers in Cloverdale and Langley City can now apply for federal funding to hire youth for summer jobs.

The Canada Summer Jobs program is a federal initiative that provides funding for summer job opportunities for youth ages 15 to 30 in communities across the country.

This year, several changes have been made to the program, following feedback from stakeholders. The eligibility has expanded — all youth in the accepted age range who are legally entitled to work in Canada can apply this year, not just students.

More notably, after controversy following the 2018 version of the program, which required applicants to state that their organization’s core mandate did not work to undermine constitutional, human and reproductive rights, the federal government clarified application requirements. In 2018, the application required an organization to support reproductive rights, including access to abortion, which angered some faith-based groups.

In the 2019 Canada Summer Jobs program, an organization can apply for funding as long as the projects and jobs that the employee would take on do not “actively work to undermine or restrict a woman’s access to sexual and reproductive health services,” “advocate intolerance,” or restrict access to services on the basis of sex, religion, race, sexual orientation or disability.

This year, the jobs program is supporting underrepresented groups of youth, trades jobs, opportunities in rural communities, opportunities in organizations that support seniors, and jobs at small businesses.

“Canada’s young people are not just the leaders of tomorrow—they are leaders today. That’s why our government is focused on ensuring more young Canadians get the skills and training they need to succeed and Canada Summer Jobs is an incredibly important program for helping young people achieve this,” said Patty Hajdu, minster of employment, in a press release. “Providing students with opportunities for paid, meaningful work experience, helps ensure they have a fair shot at success.”

“I am excited that the newly expanded Canada Summer Jobs program will once again be helping to create job opportunities for students and youth in the community of Cloverdale-Langley City this summer,” said Cloverdale-Langley City MP John Aldag in a statement. “The experiences and hands on skills that young people gain in the Canada Summer Jobs program are invaluable to their future success in today’s increasingly complex employment landscape.”

Through the federal program, not-for-profit employers can receive 100 per cent wage funding, and public-sector and small private-sector employers can receive 50 per cent wage funding.

The applications for Canada Summer Jobs 2019 are due by Jan. 25. For more information, or to apply, visit Canada.ca/Canada-summer-jobs or a Service Canada Centre.

There will also be an employer information session for Cloverdale-Langley City constituents on Jan. 17, from 1 to 3 p.m. at Timms Community Centre (20399 Douglas Crescent, Langley). Attendance is free of charge, but those interested in attending are asked to RSVP to 604-575-6595.



editor@cloverdalereporter.com

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