Former UBC creative writing professor Steve Galloway. (The Canadian Press)

Complainant vs UBC prof Steven Galloway wants investigator’s report

Lawyer says key paragraphs about complainant’s report of sexual harassment are blacked out

The lawyer for the main complainant against Steven Galloway says she’s pleased the fired creative writing professor won’t be returning to his post.

A labour arbitrator’s decision released Friday ordered the University of British Columbia to pay Galloway $167,000 in damages. It also showed that in February, the school’s faculty association withdrew its claim on behalf of Galloway for reinstatement to his post and for lost income and benefits.

“MC is pleased that Mr. Galloway will not be returning to his position of trust in his teaching position at UBC,” Joanna Birenbaum, who represents the main complainant referred to as MC, said in an email.

But Birenbaum said her client still wants Galloway to grant permission for the release of an unredacted copy of the initial investigation report.

“Key paragraphs on the findings of the investigator about MC’s report of sexual harassment are blacked out. In the name of fairness, MC calls on Mr. Galloway to withdraw his refusal, and to give permission to UBC to release the unredacted report,” Birenbaum said.

Galloway could not immediately be reached for comment.

READ MORE: UBC must pay fired author Steven Galloway $167,000 for privacy violation

The labour arbitration decision ordered UBC to pay Galloway for statements that violated his privacy rights and harmed his reputation, but it did not specifically say which communications infringed on Galloway’s privacy.

Galloway filed one grievance after he was suspended in November 2015, asserting that UBC erred when it sent a memo to faculty, staff and students that announced he had been suspended pending an investigation into “serious allegations.”

He filed a second grievance in June 2016 after he was fired, claiming the university’s communications about his termination, in which it said he was fired after an “irreparable breach of trust,” were misleading and caused serious damage to his reputation and ongoing suffering.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Fentanyl found at a Delta high school, district says

Warning issued after fake Xanax pills confiscated from a student were found to contain opioids

White Rock councillors speak out on art project

A $100,000 hospital sculpture, paid for by city, draws criticism

Metro Vancouver mayors vote to ‘develop’ $1.65B in Fraser Highway SkyTrain plans

Surrey will have to ‘compensate’ for the $56 million already spent on light rail

Sources employment services to close in White Rock, Cloverdale

Transition to new service to begin next year

Delta Gymnastics sends four on tour of Japan

Coach, three gymnastists left Dec. 4 for a two-week trip to experience Japanese gymnastics, culture

MAP: Christmas light displays in Surrey, Langley and beyond

Send us pictures of your National Lampoon-style lit-up homes, nativity scenes or North Pole playlands

Vancouver police make arrest in hit and run that killed skateboarder

Charges stem from a two-year investigation into the April 17 death of 30-year-old Ryan Barron

5 to start your day

Powerful winds anticipated in Lower Mainland, Chilliwack company facing charges in chicken abuse case and more

Increase in downed power lines in B.C., how to stay safe

BC Hydro study finds a third of British Columbians may be putting themselves at risk

Woman dies after being struck by bus in Burnaby

RCMP officers from the traffic and collision teams are investigating

Judge sets bail at $2.5 million in 1987 slaying of B.C. couple

William Talbott II, 55, is charged with two counts of aggravated first-degree murder

EU leaders vow to press on with ‘no-deal’ Brexit plans

European Union leaders have offered Theresa May sympathy but no promises, as the British prime minister seeks a lifeline.

Powerful winds set to hit Metro Vancouver, Fraser Valley, Vancouver Island

The agency says winds in coastal areas will strengthen up to 70 kilometres an hour before the front moves inland and gusts reach 90 kilometres an hour.

Mandatory victim surcharge cruel and unusual punishment, top court rules

Stephen Harper’s Conservative government made the charges mandatory in 2013.

Most Read