(Kristyn Anthony/Black Press)

Don’t agree on your property assessment? Here’s what to do

On average, only 1.3 per cent of BC homeowners appeal each year

Unhappy B.C. homeowners have less than a month to appeal 2019 property assessments.

Homeowners unsatisfied with their assessments can file appeals to have their property’s value assessed by an independent board: the Property Assessment Review Panel (PARP).

RELATED: Property assessments to rise again on Vancouver Island

Last year, 1.3 per cent of property owners appealed their assessment – 25, 760 appeals in total. That’s consistent with a ten-year average of 1.3 per cent, said Tina Ireland, a Vancouver Island assessor with BC Assessment.

Ireland encourages property owners to call in before starting the appeal process.

“We have teams of professional appraisers that can answer calls and hopefully will answer most of the questions that property owners have,” she said. “If the property owner is not satisfied there is, of course, the option to appeal.”

But before appealing, Ireland said homeowners should remember that their assessment is based on 2018 market values.

“The assessment reflects market value of their property at a specific point in time,” she said. “The 2019 assessment reflects market conditions as of July 1, 2018…Property owners should ponder whether they feel that’s a fair representation of their market value.”

B.C. residents have until Jan. 31 to appeal their 2019 property assessments – after which appeals are accepted but may be deemed invalid by PARP.

PARP hearings occur between Feb.1 and March 15 every year.

RELATED: Victoria property assessments rise as level of inventory falls to record low



nina.grossman@blackpress.ca

Follow Nina on Twitter

Just Posted

Surrey’s Flamingo ‘closing forever’ following final concert in February

Whalley venue reopened under new management in January 2018

Surrey needs 350 more cops, activist tells council

‘Right now we are 350 police behind what our population requires,’ politicians are told

Surrey reviewing clothing bin safety in wake of deaths

School district confirms all donation bins were removed from its properties, citing safety concerns

Delta bans clothing donation bins citing safety concerns

Owners have until Jan. 29 to remove the bins, after which the city will charge them for the removal

The science of edible photographs on shortbread bisquits: A Surrey artist talks

Sylvia Grace Borda at Science World a week after her art show opens at KPU

VIDEO: Car flies across median, flips over edge of Brunette overpass

Dash cam footage shows a vehicle speeding across a Lower Mainland overpass

Lower Mainland teacher resigned after ‘inappropriate discussions’ with elementary students

Tracy Joseph Fairley resigned from Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows district April 23, 2018

Indigenous energy summit includes session on pipeline ownership options

Steven Saddleback of the Indian Resource Council says a session will feature presentations on financing models

Japanese grand champion Kisenosato retires from sumo

The 32-year-old Kisenosato was the first Japanese-born wrestler in 19 years to gain promotion to sumo’s highest rank

UPDATE: Accused B.C. high school killer found fit to stand trial

Gabriel Klein is accused in the 2016 stabbing death of Letisha Reimer at Abbotsford Senior Secondary

Right-wing, neo-Nazi, white supremacist groups an increasing concern: Goodale

Ten people died in April 2018 when Alek Minassian allegedly drove a rental van down the busy stretch in Toronto

Where mattresses go to die

Mattress Recycling opens the largest of its kind mattress-recycling facility in Hope

Canadian stock exchanges to conduct lottery for ‘POT’ ticker amid high demand

The symbol became available after fertilizer Potash Corp. officially merged with Agrium Inc. in early 2018

Most Read