MAP: See if your drive home will be a priority for Surrey snowplows

City of Surrey splits its roads into three priority groups to ensure major routes get cleared first

  • Dec. 8, 2016 4:00 p.m.

When the snow starts falling, not all Surrey roads will get plowed immediately.

Instead, the City of Surrey splits its roads into three priority groups to ensure major routes get cleared first.

There are “first-priority” roads in the city – key arteries that are used by large numbers of drivers. They include main roads, bus routes and roads with steep hills.

Roads fronting and/or leading to schools and long-term care facilities are also included.

While “second-priority” roads are remaining arterial and collector routes. These include local connector roads in residential areas.

The final roads are classed as “third-priority,” and cleared last. These routes will only be maintained after all first and second priority routes are completed and driving conditions are deemed to be safe on those priority routes. The general manager of engineering uses his discretion in determining if third priority work is required.

In the event that bad weather conditions return during clearing of second and third priority routes, resources and equipment will revert back to focusing solely on first priority routes.

See also: More snow on the way with ‘intense’ storm set to hit Thursday

Intense snowfall may close Alex Fraser Bridge Thursday night

In addition to plowing, the city also uses an anti-icing spray prior to snowfall, which includes applying a brine solution that dries on roads with the leftover salt working immediately when snow begins to fall or when freezing temperatures occur. This approach effectively reduces or slows down the accumulation of snow and ice on treated pavement surfaces.

 

 

 

 

See the map above, or click here for a more high-resolution image that viewers can zoom in on.

Click here for more information on the city’s snow clearing procedures.

Rob Costanzo, Surrey’s engineering operations manager, said for the past several years, the city has budgeted $3.5 million annually for snow and ice control.

“The budget is leveraged to cover costs such as salt supply, snow plowing, salt spreading and anti-icing operations,” he explained. “Our winter seasons have been relatively mild for the past several years which has resulted in our not expending our entire $3.5 million allocated for snow and ice control. Unexpended funds are placed in an emergency reserve which we draw from if required to deal with severe weather events.”

Costanzo said the last harsh weather season was in late 2008 and early 2009.

“During that winter season that city expended over three times its annual budget causing the city to leverage its emergency funds.”

As per Surrey’s bylaw, snow clearing on sidewalks is the responsibility of the adjacent property owner.

“We ask that residents clear their sidewalks as soon as possible following a snowfall,” said Costanzo. “In addition, residents are reminded to not shovel snow onto the sidewalk or roadway but rather pile it on their lawn.”

 

 

 

 

 

Just Posted

Surrey celebrates multiculturalism with annual Fusion Festival

The two-day festival returns to Holland Park

RCMP investigate two shootings in Surrey

Incidents happened in Whalley, Newton

Surrey Board of Trade fears SkyTrain expansion will impede other transit needs

‘We need transit improvements in all of Surrey,’ Anita Huberman says

Public hearing set for two Surrey modular housing projects for homeless

Surrey council set to vote Monday on projects in Guildford, Whalley

Rich the Vegan scoots across Canada for the animals

Rich Adams is riding his push scooter across Canada to bring awareness to the dog meat trade in Asia

Canadian high school science courses behind on climate change, says UBC study

Researchers found performance on key areas varies by province and territory

UPDATE: One dead after house fire in rural Maple Ridge

Dewdney Trunk Road closed, traffic being re-routed

Six inducted into BC Hockey Hall of Fame

The 26th ceremony in Penticton welcomed powerful figures both from on and off the ice

Highway 1 closed near Revelstoke

No estimated time for opening

CRA program to help poor file taxes yields noticeable bump in people helped

Extra money allows volunteer-driven clinics to operate year-round

Recall: Certain Pacific oysters may pose threat of paralytic shellfish poisoning

Consumers urged to either return affected packages or throw them out

How a Kamloops-born man helped put us on the moon

Jim Chamberlin did troubleshooting for the Apollo program, which led to its success

Sexual harassment complaints soaring amid ‘frat boy culture’ in Canada’s airline industry

‘It’s a #MeToo dumpster fire…and it’s exhausting for survivors’

Most Read