Metro Vancouver is encouraging residents to “think thrice” before tossing that ugly blouse, ripped jeans or socks with holes into the garbage. (Metro Vancouver/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Metro Vancouver wants the region to repurpose, donate, or repair used clothing

Textile mending workshops to be held across the Lower Mainland

Metro Vancouver is encouraging residents to “think thrice” before tossing that ugly blouse, ripped jeans, or socks with holes into the garbage.

Most unwanted clothing items can be repurposed, donated, or repaired – reducing the amount of waste in the region.

Clothing is never garbage, because textile materials are durable and have a long useful life, said Jack Froese, chair of Metro Vancouver’s Zero Waste Committee.

“There’s a range of options to donate clothing. Many thrift stores or second-hand retailers offer a pick up service from your home and accept donations in-store. Metro Vancouver transfer stations also offer donation bins,” Froese explained.

According to the committee, Metro Vancouver residents collectively throw out an average of 44 million pounds of textiles each year, equating to the weight of 44 t-shirts per person.

New public opinion research conducted by Metro Vancouver suggests people are likely to donate clothing they no longer need, but approximately 40 per cent of respondents were unclear what can or can’t be donated.

Metro Vancouver, through its website www.clothesarentgarbage.ca, hopes to help residents with this conundrum, noting the message from second- hand clothing retailers is that they will accept almost anything.

“The main thing is that the clothing you are donating should be clean, dry and packed in a box or bag,” added Froese. “Mouldy, paint-stained or oil-covered clothes can be difficult to re-use but clothes with holes or a single shoe can still be repurposed for a new and longer life.”

READ MORE: ‘Unloved’ textiles get a second life through recycling program

Those who aren’t quite ready to part with a well-loved item, and are keen to repair their damaged clothing – as reported by more than 61% of women and 49% of men in the survey – can find tips on DIY clothing repair and alterations at www.clothesarentgarbage.ca.

Metro Vancouver has also partnered with Frameworq, a local non-profit organization that facilitates clothing swaps and free clothing “fix-it“ events that focus on teaching practical clothing repair skills.

Upcoming event dates include:

Archive Consignment Pop-up on Feb. 28 and March 1 at the Chinese Cultural Centre in Vancouver.

Birth Fair, March 7 to 8, at the Coast Langley Hotel.

Richmond Repair Fair, March 14, at Richmond City Hall.

Those who attend will be provided with a small DIY mending kit to assist with their own clothing repairs.

Find out more about the events at www.frameworq.ca.

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Email: ryan.uytdewilligen@langleyadvancetimes.com

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