Surrey-White Rock MLA Tracy Redies seeks written answers on water issues. (BC Liberal Government Caucus image)

MLA Redies seeks water answers for constituent

Mayor, Fraser Health and City of Surrey queried on quality and safety issues

Surrey-White Rock MLA Tracy Redies is wading into White Rock water issues in an attempt to clear up questions for a constituent – and is looking for written answers.

In a letter sent Dec. 18 to White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin, Fraser Health president and CEO Michael Marchbank and City of Surrey head of operations Vince Lalonde, Redies said she is seeking “clarity on a number of questions that have been posed to the province and the city for many months by Mr. Roderick Louis regarding water quality and safety in the City of White Rock.”

Redies said that while she recognizes it will involve investigation and work on their part, “I would appreciate your written response at your earliest convenience…I hope if we can put these matters to rest, it will save all of us time in the long run.”

Louis, a well-known council critic – particularly on water issues – has had frequently abrasive interactions with council members, and also city staff, during public meetings, and was escorted from council chambers by RCMP officers during a Sept. 12, 2016 meeting at the request of Baldwin.

Among questions posed by Redies on behalf of Louis are some on White Rock water quality and the presence of arsenic and manganese in the water – for which the city has started work on a $14-million treatment plant, adjacent to the Oxford Street pumping station (co-funded by federal and provincial grants totalling $11 million, the facility is due for completion in 2019).

Redies – first elected last spring – wants to know why a $100,000 public education outreach program from former utility owner Epcor was requested in a written directive from Fraser Health in February of 2014, and why it hasn’t been done so far.

She also asks what actions the city has undertaken to educate the public on water quality and the steps being taken to improve it, whether the city is complying with FHA guidelines for the treatment and public reporting expectations for water systems containing arsenic, if it can be confirmed that current water quality is acceptable according to Canadian health standards and whether the proposed next steps will result in an improved water quality.

On the contentious issue of the Five Corners fire on May 15, 2016, Redies asks what steps the city has taken in response to final report findings on the fire.

Referring to reports that White Rock was not able to access emergency water supplies from Surrey due to malfunctioning connection valves, Redies asks for a full explanation of “what happened with the valves?” including whether Peace Arch Hospital was impacted by a subsequent lack of water.

Noting earlier references to six valves, Redies points out that the city’s 2017 Water Master Plan only refers to four valves connecting White Rock’s water system with Surrey’s in case of emergency.

“Going forward,” she says in her letter, “what are the steps being taken to improve the working of these valves, or vice versa for Surrey, that they are working properly?”

Just Posted

Surrey latest city to denounce Quebec’s Bill 21

The bill bans public workers from wearing religious symbols while working

Cloverdale ‘Ladies’ Night Out’ shopping event expected to draw thousands

Annual event kicks off the holiday shopping season in downtown Cloverdale

Surrey RCMP say three people deported in connection to brawl caught on video

Police say they have been ‘actively engaged’ in the issue of youth fights in Newton since March

South Surrey’s A Rocha Canada an agriculture-leader finalist

Surrey Board of Trade industry event set for Nov. 21

Guildford highrise proposals pass third reading despite community opposition

City of Surrey received 229-signature petition opposing the plan

Bye bye Bei Bei: Giant panda born in U.S. zoo heads to China

Panda heads back to China as part of cooperative breeding program

B.C. man gets 23 years for murder of Belgian tourist near Boston Bar

Sean McKenzie pleaded guilty to second-degree murder of 28-year-old Amelie Christelle Sakkalis

Workers union calls strike vote in SkyTrain labour dispute

Mediated talks are scheduled to begin Nov. 28

‘Vancouver’s North Pole’ set to open with skating pond, Light Walk and more

Annual attraction at Grouse Mountain raises funds for BC Children’s Hospital

‘Very disrespectful’: B.C. first responder irked by motorists recording collisions on cellphones

Central Cariboo Search and Rescue deputy chief challenges motorists to break the habit

Daily cannabis linked to reduction in opioid use: B.C. researchres

Researchers looked at a group of 1,152 people in Vancouver who reported substance use and chronic pain

Bids down, costs up on Highway 1, B.C. independent contractors say

Rally protests NDP government’s union-only public construction

Members of little people community applaud change to drop ‘midget’ term

‘It’s not about sensitivity,’ says Allan Redford, the president of the Little People of Canada

‘Police incident’ leads Squamish RCMP to ask public to leave Stawamus Chief

People were told to expected a ‘noted police presence’

Most Read