Nick Greenizan photo In South Surrey Monday morning, Patty Hajdu, federal minister of employment, announces that 5,100 jobs will come to the Lower Mainland through the Canada Summer Jobs program.

More than 5,000 summer jobs coming to Lower Mainland, feds announce

Employment Minister Patty Hajdu announces Canada Summer Job program numbers in South Surrey

More than 5,000 summer jobs are coming to the Lower Mainland this year through the Canada Summer Jobs program, including 221 on the Semiahmoo Peninsula, it was announced in South Surrey Monday morning.

Patty Hajdu, Canada’s minister of employment, workforce development and labour, made the announcement at Semiahmoo House Society, which is a summer-jobs program employer. Hajdu, the MP for Thunder Bay-Superior North in Ontario, was joined at the event by MP Gordie Hogg (South Surrey-White Rock) as well as a handful of Semiahmoo House Society ambassadors.

“I’m really excited about this program. I remember back when I was a teenager, and it was really hard to get a summer job,” Hajdu said.

“It was hard to get a job with a not-for-profit organization, or the city… the kind of jobs we know help young people build skills.

“This program is about making sure as many young people as possible have access to good quality summer jobs that are going to give them those fundamental job skills… and maybe even define their career.”

In total, the program will create more than 5,100 jobs across the Lower Mainland, the ministry noted.

Prior to making the official announcement, Hajdu took a private tour of Semiahmoo House Society’s facility, as well as the Chorus Apartments next door.

The 71-unit building, which was built in 2016, provides housing for those with disabilities, as well as those of low to moderate income.

Prior to Hajdu’s prepared remarks, it was noted that 17 of the 221 South Surrey/White Rock summer jobs would involve Semiahmoo House Society members.

The Canada Summer Jobs program was criticized earlier this year by churches and other religious organizations when it was announced by the federal Liberals that applicants to the program, in order to be considered, must attest to their respect for sexual and reproductive rights – including the right to access safe and legal abortions.

Following the outcry, the government adjusted the language of the clause – adding that faith-based organizations were welcome to apply – but stood firm on its decision to deny grants to groups advocating against abortion.

Just Posted

VIDEO: Burn scars now a ‘badge of honour’

White Rock woman shares story of survival after a terrible accident in 1978

Nobody injured after vehicle crashes into two Surrey businesses

Fleetwood incident happened at approximately 11 a.m.

Historic Stewart Farm’s Royal Victorian Party

Event celebrated in South Surrey last week

Quick action likely saved White Rock man

South Surrey’s Patrick Storoshenko was there to help, when nobody else was

Buy a lotto ticket and be a hero to B.C. burn victims

The Hometown Heroes Lottery is offering up seven grand prizes including a home in Lake Country

VIDEO: Pipeline supporters rally across B.C.

Five simultaneous events organized by month-old Suits and Boots lobby group

Giant beer tanks arrive in new B.C. home city

Molson Coors tanks finish river journey and move to overland trip in Chilliwack

B.C.’s Ryan Craig, Vegas Golden Knights chase history

Local product behind bench for expansion team’s incredible championship run

CP rail workers give strike notice

Employees could walk out as early as Tuesday at 7 p.m. PT

Vote points to abortion being legalized in Ireland

Voters asked whether to keep or repeal Eighth Amendment to Roman Catholic Ireland’s Constitution

COLUMN: Women’s breasts really aren’t that big a deal

A follow on some Princeton, B.C., students gained considerable exposure when they dropped their bras

Canadian soccer officials talk up World Cup bid at Champions League final

Current bid calls for 2026 World Cup games to be staged in the U.S., Canada and Mexico

Most Read