Nick Greenizan photo In South Surrey Monday morning, Patty Hajdu, federal minister of employment, announces that 5,100 jobs will come to the Lower Mainland through the Canada Summer Jobs program.

More than 5,000 summer jobs coming to Lower Mainland, feds announce

Employment Minister Patty Hajdu announces Canada Summer Job program numbers in South Surrey

More than 5,000 summer jobs are coming to the Lower Mainland this year through the Canada Summer Jobs program, including 221 on the Semiahmoo Peninsula, it was announced in South Surrey Monday morning.

Patty Hajdu, Canada’s minister of employment, workforce development and labour, made the announcement at Semiahmoo House Society, which is a summer-jobs program employer. Hajdu, the MP for Thunder Bay-Superior North in Ontario, was joined at the event by MP Gordie Hogg (South Surrey-White Rock) as well as a handful of Semiahmoo House Society ambassadors.

“I’m really excited about this program. I remember back when I was a teenager, and it was really hard to get a summer job,” Hajdu said.

“It was hard to get a job with a not-for-profit organization, or the city… the kind of jobs we know help young people build skills.

“This program is about making sure as many young people as possible have access to good quality summer jobs that are going to give them those fundamental job skills… and maybe even define their career.”

In total, the program will create more than 5,100 jobs across the Lower Mainland, the ministry noted.

Prior to making the official announcement, Hajdu took a private tour of Semiahmoo House Society’s facility, as well as the Chorus Apartments next door.

The 71-unit building, which was built in 2016, provides housing for those with disabilities, as well as those of low to moderate income.

Prior to Hajdu’s prepared remarks, it was noted that 17 of the 221 South Surrey/White Rock summer jobs would involve Semiahmoo House Society members.

The Canada Summer Jobs program was criticized earlier this year by churches and other religious organizations when it was announced by the federal Liberals that applicants to the program, in order to be considered, must attest to their respect for sexual and reproductive rights – including the right to access safe and legal abortions.

Following the outcry, the government adjusted the language of the clause – adding that faith-based organizations were welcome to apply – but stood firm on its decision to deny grants to groups advocating against abortion.

Just Posted

The struggle for space inside Surrey’s elementary schools

SECOND IN A SERIES: A look at how overcrowding impacts student life

South Surrey Spirit Garden to host Solstice Stroll

Candlelight event to begin at 8 p.m. June 22

VIDEO: 5X Festival takes over Surrey’s Central City plaza

Second annual event draws thousands of people throughout the day

Police in North Delta nab alleged thief riding stolen bike, carrying another

Terry Lee Pipe, 43, of Surrey, has been charged with possession of property obtained by crime

Semiahmoo First Nation opens cannabis dispensary

Indigenous Bloom partners with First Nations

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

Parents of BC murder victim want personal belongings returned

Lisa Dudley’s parents, Rosemarie and Mark Surakka, were at the Mission RCMP detachment Sunday

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Pride flag taken down by Township of Langley

Woman said she was told it was removed from her front yard because of a complaint

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

Most Read