Pipeline protest reaches White Rock waterfront

Sparse crowd opposes Kinder Morgan project but organizers say they plan to expand local efforts as part of wider B.C. campaign

Emily Killaly was one of those who came out to the White Rock waterfront Saturday afternoon to protest the planned Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

A protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in White Rock Saturday afternoon may have been sparsely attended, but organizers say such opposition could presage a great deal more resistance to the project in B.C., despite last week’s approval of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberal cabinet.

While fewer than 20 people gathered for a waterfront protest outside the White Rock Museum and Archives building Saturday afternoon, Mary Leighton of the provincewide environmental awareness organization The Dogwood Initiative said it exceeded her expectations for a first event in Surrey and White Rock.

“I’m so impressed,” she said, adding that the local effort was one of more than 17 protests taking place as part of the same ‘day of action’ organized by the group throughout B.C.

While The Dogwood Initiative’s volunteer teams “usually get a pretty good turnout” in Vancouver, she said, the White Rock protest was principally the result of an email sent out last week to see if such efforts could be expanded here.

“It was just an incredible response – I expected to get eight, but to get 23 RSVPs was a real pleasure.”

She said that, after spending the remainder of Saturday canvassing for signatures for a “citizens initiative to block Kinder Morgan,” the ad-hoc group who gathered for the protest would discuss the establishment of a satellite neighborhood organization in Surrey/White Rock in 2017.

While Leighton said the decision to grant conditional approval, announced by Trudeau Nov. 29 was “disappointing” she said it was expected, judging by earlier opinions expressed by members of the cabinet.

Meanwhile, while B.C. has yet to endorse the project, Premier Christy Clark has indicated the project is close to fulfilling the environmental conditions the government has set.

Dogwood Initiative members predict a number of potential local and provincial impacts of the

project, which would expand and twin the 1953 Trans Mountain pipeline to pump diluted bitumen west from Edmonton to the Kinder Morgan terminal on Burrard Inlet in Burnaby – with a portion of the pipeline travelling through North Surrey.

Pipeline opponents fear that an inland rupture of the line could leach into the Fraser River and destroy the salmon fishery, while seepage into aquifers could make ground water undrinkable.

A seven-fold increase of tanker shipping in B.C. waters to some 400-plus ships per year could also threaten safety, the ecological balance of the coastline, including such wildlife species as southern resident killer whales, and the economic livelihood of communities all along the coast, they warn.

Even with more visible protests than Saturday’s gathering, observers predict that the greatest opposition to Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain proposal will come in the courtroom, where it will likely face as much legal opposition as the defeated Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline proposed for a route crossing northern B.C.

Enbridge was met by a total of 17 court challenges, while Kinder Morgan already faces seven.

It is predicted that many legal actions will come from First Nations, who would claim that the National Energy Board and, subsequently, the Trudeau cabinet, failed to adequately and meaningfully consult them about the pipeline.

– with files from Boaz Joseph & Jeff Nagel

 

 

 

 

Just Posted

Surrey moves to ban sleeping overnight in RVs, motorhomes on city streets

Proposal comes amid complaints about homeless people living in recreational vehicles

$50,000 reward for ‘extremely violent’ South Surrey murder suspect renewed

Offer for information on Brandon Teixeira to remain in effect through April, 2020

Surrey restaurant owner who pointed handgun at staff loses court appeal

Jawahar Singh Padda tried to get his 30-month sentenced reduced

White Rock senior ‘just sick’ about lost rings

Wedding, engagement bands discovered missing on Oct. 7

Surrey cold-case murder is Crime Stoppers’ ‘Crime of the week’

Police have yet to arrest a suspect in the April 24, 2011 murder of Devon Allaire-Bell, 19, in Newton

VIDEO: First all-female spacewalk team makes history

NASA astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir did work on International Space Station’s power grid

Zantac, the over-the-counter heartburn drug, pulled in Canada, U.S.

Health Canada also investigates possible carcinogen in some ranitidine drugs

B.C. public safety minister says cannabis edibles not in stores til January

Mike Farnworth says he wants regional issues considered when it comes to licensing

Greta Thunberg calls for climate action in Alberta, but doesn’t talk oilsands

Swedish teen was met with some oil and gas industry supporters who came in a truck convoy

Scheer denies spreading ‘misinformation’ in predicting unannounced Liberal taxes

Conservative leader had claimed that a potential NDP-Liberal coalition could lead to a hike in GST

Council asks to limit cruise ship visits to Victoria harbour

Mayor says motion is not meant to curtail current visits or limit local cruise industry expansion

Chilliwack man pleads guilty in crash that killed pregnant woman

Frank Tessman charged under Motor Vehicle Act for accident that killed Kelowna school teacher

Kawhi Leonard, former Toronto Raptor, welcomed back to Vancouver at pre-season game

Fans go wild at pre-season game between L.A. Clippers and Dallas Mavericks at Rogers Arena

Greens and NDP go head to head on West Coast; Scheer takes fight to Bernier

Trudeau turns focus to key ridings outside Toronto after two days in Quebec

Most Read