Pipeline protest reaches White Rock waterfront

Sparse crowd opposes Kinder Morgan project but organizers say they plan to expand local efforts as part of wider B.C. campaign

Emily Killaly was one of those who came out to the White Rock waterfront Saturday afternoon to protest the planned Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

A protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in White Rock Saturday afternoon may have been sparsely attended, but organizers say such opposition could presage a great deal more resistance to the project in B.C., despite last week’s approval of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberal cabinet.

While fewer than 20 people gathered for a waterfront protest outside the White Rock Museum and Archives building Saturday afternoon, Mary Leighton of the provincewide environmental awareness organization The Dogwood Initiative said it exceeded her expectations for a first event in Surrey and White Rock.

“I’m so impressed,” she said, adding that the local effort was one of more than 17 protests taking place as part of the same ‘day of action’ organized by the group throughout B.C.

While The Dogwood Initiative’s volunteer teams “usually get a pretty good turnout” in Vancouver, she said, the White Rock protest was principally the result of an email sent out last week to see if such efforts could be expanded here.

“It was just an incredible response – I expected to get eight, but to get 23 RSVPs was a real pleasure.”

She said that, after spending the remainder of Saturday canvassing for signatures for a “citizens initiative to block Kinder Morgan,” the ad-hoc group who gathered for the protest would discuss the establishment of a satellite neighborhood organization in Surrey/White Rock in 2017.

While Leighton said the decision to grant conditional approval, announced by Trudeau Nov. 29 was “disappointing” she said it was expected, judging by earlier opinions expressed by members of the cabinet.

Meanwhile, while B.C. has yet to endorse the project, Premier Christy Clark has indicated the project is close to fulfilling the environmental conditions the government has set.

Dogwood Initiative members predict a number of potential local and provincial impacts of the

project, which would expand and twin the 1953 Trans Mountain pipeline to pump diluted bitumen west from Edmonton to the Kinder Morgan terminal on Burrard Inlet in Burnaby – with a portion of the pipeline travelling through North Surrey.

Pipeline opponents fear that an inland rupture of the line could leach into the Fraser River and destroy the salmon fishery, while seepage into aquifers could make ground water undrinkable.

A seven-fold increase of tanker shipping in B.C. waters to some 400-plus ships per year could also threaten safety, the ecological balance of the coastline, including such wildlife species as southern resident killer whales, and the economic livelihood of communities all along the coast, they warn.

Even with more visible protests than Saturday’s gathering, observers predict that the greatest opposition to Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain proposal will come in the courtroom, where it will likely face as much legal opposition as the defeated Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline proposed for a route crossing northern B.C.

Enbridge was met by a total of 17 court challenges, while Kinder Morgan already faces seven.

It is predicted that many legal actions will come from First Nations, who would claim that the National Energy Board and, subsequently, the Trudeau cabinet, failed to adequately and meaningfully consult them about the pipeline.

– with files from Boaz Joseph & Jeff Nagel

 

 

 

 

Just Posted

Surrey wants BNSF to slow Crescent trains

Mayor Linda Hepner said ‘it’s the least we can do’

Rail-safety forum planned for White Rock this Friday

Event to include municipal, federal, provincial governments

White Rock open house to discuss city’s aquifer protection plan

Examination of potential hazards includes increased population, climate change

‘Connecting Threads’ and more in Surrey Art Gallery’s fall shows

Free admission at opening reception and panel discussion Sunday afternoon

SFU unveils new lab at Surrey Memorial Hospital

Combination of MRI, MEG allows for ‘best possible windows’ intro brain function

B.C. RCMP turn to Const. Scarecrow to shock speeders into slowing down

New addition will watch over drivers from a Coquitlam median for first-of-its-kind pilot in Canada

B.C. home to 1/3 of Canada’s overdose deaths in first 3 months of the year

There were 1,036 overdose deaths in the first three months of the year, with 94 per cent accidental

B.C. candidate moves from hospice care to council race

He beat terminal cancer twice and entered hospice when he decided to run for council.

Canadian tobacco exec pushes back against vaping health concerns

A warning from Interior Health about the unknown health risks of vaping is getting a partial rebuke

New ‘meowyoral’ race featuring felines announced by B.C. animal shelter

Organizers hope the cat election will generate attention for shelter and local municipal election

Ministry of Agriculture commits $300,000 to help B.C. farmers obtain land

B.C. Land Matching Program supports access to affordable farmland for young farmers

Canadian air force short 275 pilots

Attrition outpaces recruitment and training claims Air Force

Teacher suspended after physically shushing, saying ‘shut up’ to student

Grade 5 student reported feeling ‘confused and a little scared’

Most Read