Submitted Photo                                Injured poodle Rux after being attacked by a pit bull in Garrison Crossing Aug. 31.

Submitted Photo Injured poodle Rux after being attacked by a pit bull in Garrison Crossing Aug. 31.

Pit bull attack spurs call for provincewide dangerous dog registry

Animal control officers ask for provincial help to assist in seizures

Following a recent dog attack in Chilliwack, the provincial association that backs animal control officers is calling once again for a provincewide dangerous dog registry.

The Licence Inspectors’ and Bylaw Officers’ Association of BC (LIBOA) commended the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD) animal control officers that tracked down a pit bull involved in a vicious attack on a woman and her dog in broad daylight in Garrison Crossing on Aug. 31.

It took a month with the dog’s owner hiding the dog, even altering its colour, but with the help of the RCMP, animal control tracked down the dog on Sept. 28.

A month after being attacked by a pit bull, a Chilliwack woman’s wounds have not healed and she is suffering with a serious antibiotic resistant infection. (Submitted)

READ MORE: Chilliwack owner of pit bull involved in violent attack altered dog’s colour

And while LIBOA commended the job done, the association said these situations are all too common.

“LIBOA is hopeful the new [provincial NDP] government will finally take animal control and public safety as it relates to dangerous dogs and their owners seriously,” LIBOA vice-president Steffan Zamzow said. “The latest incident in Chilliwack is another reminder that the provincial government needs to take proactive measures to ensure the safety of the public, a service that LIBOA is eager to engage in discussions with the government about.”

LIBOA has been pursuing a provincial dangerous dog registry since early 2016, ​when another serious attack occurred in Pitt Meadows.

RELATED: ‘Justice for Buttons’ in Pitt Meadows

John Becker, Mayor of Pitt Meadows, proposed such a registry at the 2016 Union of British Columbia Municipalities convention, with the motion unanimously passing. LIBOA followed by sending a letter to the then-B.C. Liberal government, specifically the Attorney General and Minister of Justice asking to partner with the province in the implementation of a registry.

READ MORE: B.C.-wide registry of dangerous dogs urged

In the spring of 2017, LIBOA received a response from the government stating that they had no plans to establish a registry.

Injured poodle Rux after being attacked by a pit bull in Garrison Crossing Aug. 31. (Submitted)

“If the province were to work with our association, we could develop a registry that would not only provide much needed assistance to those who are investigating incidents involving dangerous dogs, but also provide consistency among municipalities on how dangerous dogs are monitored,” LIBOA president Inder Litt said.

“With multiple cases of dogs being hidden or stolen from shelters, including the recent incidents in Chilliwack and Revelstoke, the non-existence of such a registry continues to put communities and its citizens at risk,” LIBOA said in a statement.

Last month in Revelstoke, an unknown person broke into the city’s animal shelter and stole a pit bull that had previously attacked a woman and her daughter.

READ MORE: Dangerous dog at large in Revelstoke

LIBOA said it will continue to advocate for a registry for municipalities, while still continuing to pressure the province to assist in the creation of a registry.

“LIBOA strongly believes that such a registry would aid officers in the tracking and monitoring of dangerous dogs, and be a beneficial tool in enhancing community safety and ensuring owners are held accountable for the actions of their dogs.”

As for the pit bull involved in the Chilliwack case, Magnum, it is in possession of the FVRD and the district is applying to have the dog euthanized. The case is still before the courts, and could take an extensive period of time, according to those involved.

More than a month after the attack, the woman attacked by Magnum is at risk of sepsis as she fights off a life-threatening infection.

READ MORE: Violent pit bull attack leaves Chilliwack woman with tendon damage

Her dog Rux was also attacked by Magnum, and he too is still fighting for his life after more than $10,000 in vet bills. Rux was raised and trained to be a therapy dog but had not yet started work.


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

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A man holds on to the leash of his dog that viciously attacked a woman in Garrison Crossing in Chilliwack on Aug. 31. He took off, hid the dog and altered its colour but animal control has now seized it. (Submitted)

A man holds on to the leash of his dog that viciously attacked a woman in Garrison Crossing in Chilliwack on Aug. 31. He took off, hid the dog and altered its colour but animal control has now seized it. (Submitted)

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