Province makes ‘single biggest injection’ into Surrey rental stock with $32M commitment

Housing projects to target single moms, seniors and low-income families

Premier Christy Clark was in Surrey Tuesday to announce funding commitments to rental housing projects throughout the province.

SURREY — Premier Christy Clark was at Surrey’s Centre for Child Development on Tuesday (Nov. 22) to announce a $516 million investment that will create 2,900 additional affordable housing units across B.C. to “increase rental supply.”

Of that, $32.2 million will be coming to Surrey. Five of the 68 projects are to be built in Surrey, creating 326 units.

Surrey Mayor Linda Hepner said it’s the “single biggest injection of new (rental) housing stock in the history of the city.”

“I’m pleased to see it and I’m pleased to see it’s going to assist in the housing of some of the more vulnerable people we have in the city,” Hepner added.

Click here for information on all 68 projects

The province has committed $4.7 million to a 40-unit housing project for single women with children with special needs, in partnership with the YWCA Metro Vancouver, at 9460 140th St. Another 48-unit project is planned in partnership with the Elizabeth Fry Society for single women and single moms.

A 48-unit project is also planned at 12525 106th Ave. through the Royal Canadian Legion targeting veterans and their spouses, as well as a 74-unit project through the Kekinow Native Housing Society.

Finally, a 116-unit is planned in Whalley targeting households with low to moderate incomes.

“It’s really incredible to think about and hear first hand the challenges that some single parents live with everyday,” said Clark.

She said in addition to helping keep the “dream of having a home” alive for the middle class and all of British Columbians, the projects will create 5,500 new jobs.

“I think we are making progress,” said Clark of the province’s work to address homelessness and affordable housing. “I think, though, the lack of (rental) supply makes it harder all the time.”

She noted that in order to fully address the problem some municipalities must add more rental supply, and that the federal government must step up to help as well.

“We’re going to do everything we can that’s within our power. These 5,000 units will make a big difference,” she remarked, “but we can not do it alone.”

The funds are expected to be distributed before year’s end, said housing minister Rich Coleman, and he hopes to see project’s completed within two years.

See details of each project below:

amy.reid@thenownewspaper.com

 

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