Ramona Kaptyn. (Submitted photo)

Ramona Kaptyn to run as Surrey Connect candidate in next election

South Surrey resident joins Couns. Brenda Locke and Jack Hundial as the slate’s third candidate

Surrey city Couns. Brenda Locke and Jack Hundial introduced the newest member of their Surrey Connect slate Thursday (Nov. 26), announcing Ramona Kaptyn as their third candidate for the October 2022 civic election.

READ MORE: Hundial and Locke’s new slate looks to ‘Connect’ with Surrey residents

In a virtual press conference, Locke described the South Surrey resident – who, among other things, is president of the White Rock/Surrey Chapter of CARP – A New Vision of Aging for Canada – as “just an amazing addition to our team.”

“She’s a communications specialist,” Locke said, in highlighting Kaptyn’s background as a journalist, public information officer and other posts.

“That’s something we’ve certainly seen lacking in these last two years with council.”

Kaptyn, noting good governance is a priority for her, said in watching what has been happening in Surrey, “I just felt I had to step up.”

“I’m just gobsmacked at the lack of honesty and transparency.”

Asked to elaborate on those points, Kaptyn said her efforts to connect with the mayor and four Safe Surrey Coalition councillors have routinely gone without response. In a call Monday, “what did the mayor do? He cut me off,” she said. The reception is a stark contrast to what she has experienced with Locke and Hundial, as well as Couns. Linda Annis and Steven Pettigrew, she said.

“When you’re elected, you serve the entire community,” Kaptyn continued. “Each and every one of us deserves to be heard.”

Kaptyn said she’s also “very passionate” about the police-transition issue. It “was one of my biggies” in making the decision to join Surrey Connect, she said.

“I’m not against changing police forces,” she noted, commending the RCMP, “but if we’re going to switch, we should be doing it in the proper way, and not during a pandemic.”

In addition to being president of the local CARP chapter, Kaptyn is a director of the CARP National Board, which is Canada’s largest advocacy association for older adults.

She is also director of the South Surrey/White Rock Chamber of Commerce, a member of the City of White Rock Seniors Advisory Committee, a member of the Semiahmoo Seniors Planning Table’s steering committee and is a graduate of Ryerson University (Journalism) and the University of Toronto (Education/Political Science).

Among other hats Kaptyn has worn are communications specialist, reporter, travel writer, editor, teacher, public information officer for the government of Ontario, hotel managing director, and fundraiser in Canada, Australia, England, Spain and Asia.

Hundial said Kaptyn’s addition to the Surrey Connect slate, “when you see where we are today and where we need to go… made sense.”

“She definitely will be a strong advocate right across for the different communities we have here in Surrey.”

– with files from Tom Zytaruk



tholmes@peacearchnews.com
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

City of Surrey

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Record-setting high jumper Emma de Boer, who lives in Cloverdale and attends Holy Cross Regional High School in Fleetwood, will train and study architecture at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) next fall. (submitted photo)
Surrey jumper on a high after recruitment by UPenn track team

High jumper Emma de Boer aims to leave Cloverdale for Philadelphia next fall

Surrey RCMP Gang Enforcement Team street check. (File photo)
Surrey RCMP gang enforcement team seizes five vehicles

This was over 13 days, as SGET continues to target gang activity in this city

File photo
Surrey to borrow $150 million for three major recreation projects

That’s for a sports complex in the city centre, a sports and ice complex in Cloverdale and a community centre in Newton

Tim Baillie, the “Supreme Commander” of Toque Tuesday events in Surrey, at Surrey Civic Plaza in 2018. (File photo: Bala Yogesh)
Ball hockey scrubbed, Surrey’s ‘Toque Tuesday’ turns to drive-thru collection to help homeless

‘Clean out your closets and stop by from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.,’ urges the event’s ‘Supreme Commander’

Dr. Penny Ballem, a former deputy health minister, discusses her role in leading B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccination program, at the B.C. legislature, Jan. 22, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C. holds steady with 407 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday

14 deaths, no new outbreaks in the health care system

B.C. Premier John Horgan listens during a postelection news conference in Vancouver on Sunday, Oct. 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
30% of B.C. recovery benefit applications held up in manual review

The province says 150 staff have been reassigned to help with manually reviewing applications

Adam Dergazarian, bottom center, pays his respect for Kobe Bryant and his daughter, Gianna, in front of a mural painted by artist Louie Sloe Palsino, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Kobe Bryant’s presence remains strong a year after his death

Tuesday marks the grim anniversary of the crash that took their lives

Surrey RCMP are investigating after a pedestrian was struck and killed at 183 Street and Highway 10 Friday night. (File photo)
RCMP officers wearing face masks to curb the spread of COVID-19 stand by. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)
RCMP appeal for witnesses after hit-and-run leaves girl, 17, in critical condition

The Metro Vancouver teenager was found unconscious and critically injured after being hit: police

The Brucejack mine is 65 km north of Stewart in northwestern B.C. (Pretivm Photo)
B.C. mine executives see bright gleam in post-COVID future

Low carbon drives demand for copper, steelmaking coal

In this Dec. 18, 2020 photo, pipes to be used for the Keystone XL pipeline are stored in a field near Dorchester, Neb.  THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Chris Machian /Omaha World-Herald via AP
Canadians divided over Keystone pipeline, despite U.S. president’s permit pullback

Two-thirds of Canadians think Biden’s decision was a “bad thing” for Alberta

Langley activist Dorscie Paterson celebrated her 108th birthday on Monday, Jan. 25 at the Cedar Hill long term care facility. Because of the pandemic, she remained inside, able to see, but not shake hands with visitors. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
VIDEO: Celebrating a 108th birthday without physical contact

Pandemic required Langley woman to stay behind a window

A woman wearing a protective face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 walks past a mural in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
5 big lessons experts say Canada should learn from COVID-19

‘What should be done to reduce the harms the next time a virus arises?’ Disease control experts answer

Most Read