Groundbreaking for the new Clayton Community Centre. (Sam Anderson photo)

UPDATE: Surrey breaks ground on $43M Clayton Community Centre

Centre will include library, gym, art studios and green spaces

The $43.5-million Clayton Community Centre is now officially underway in Cloverdale.

Surrey council and project partners broke ground today at the construction site, located along 72 Avenue between 184 and 188 Street.

The 76,000-square foot community centre will have a library, gymnasium, child care facility, art and music studios, several multi-purpose rooms, and a rehearsal hall on the main floor. The second level will contain additional library space, a fitness centre and more multi-purpose rooms.

When the project is completed, the City of Surrey expects it to be the largest Passivhaus facility in the country. Passivhaus, meaning “passive house,” is a rigorous, internationally recognized standard that creates ultra-low energy buildings. Constructing a building to that standard typically increases a project’s budget by 5 to 10 per cent, but can lead to 75 to 95 per cent less energy spent in heating and cooling, according to the Passivhaus Institute.

“Surrey can justifiably be proud of its commitment to excellence in civic facilities, benefiting all residents for decades to come,” said Rob Bernhardt, CEO of Passive House Canada, in a prepared statement. “Passive House certification offers third party quality assurance of not only the highest level of energy efficiency, but of low operating costs and exceptional comfort, indoor air quality, durability and resilience.”

The design, created by HCMA Architecture + Design, has been shortlisted for a World Architecture Festival award in the Civic Future Projects category.

“The goal of the facility is to leverage service integration and promote connectivity, resulting in a barrier-free, flexible and adaptive space for all community members to enjoy together,” said Mayor Linda Hepner in a press release. “This innovative facility will not only play an important role in community life and identity of Clayton Heights, but also serve as an international icon in green building design.”

Natural Resources Canada provided $1.3 million in funding for the project, BC Hydro gave $30,000 and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Green Municipal Fund provided $175,000.

“Investments in energy efficiency help reduce the environmental impacts of energy use while saving Canadians money,” said John Aldag, Cloverdale-Langley City MP. “This project — a North American ‘first’ right here in Surrey — demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to working with the provinces and territories to improve energy efficiency and the environmental performance of our public infrastructure. It shows Canadians and the world that we are leaders in building innovation.”

The project is expected to be complete by mid-2020.



editor@cloverdalereporter.com

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