Surrey seizes ‘record’ $100K of illegal fireworks before Halloween

Penalties range from fines of up to $1,000 to a loss of their business license for businesses found selling illegal fireworks.

  • Oct. 28, 2016 8:00 a.m.

The City of Surrey says it's seized $100

The City of Surrey says bylaw officers seized a record $100,000 of illegal fireworks and firecrackers over a 48-hour period.

In an effort to reduce injuries related to the use of fireworks and firecrackers, as well as alleviate the noise complaints associated to such use, the city says this year’s operation targeted businesses, mobile vendors and those selling out of their private residences in Surrey.

The city says the illegal sale of fireworks is being conducted through online advertising, social media and storefronts which sell the illegal fireworks under the counter.

The penalties range from fines of up to $1,000 to a suspension or loss of their business license for businesses found selling illegal fireworks.

When appropriate, a Violation Ticket under the Explosives Act will be issued by Surrey RCMP.

Fireworks in the City of Surrey are not permitted to be discharged. The only exception is with both a Fire Department permit and Federal fireworks supervisor certificate.

Since Surrey implemented the Fireworks Bylaw in 2005 there has been a marked decrease in injuries and fires caused by fireworks, the city says.

Bylaw Enforcement officers will continue to target illegal fireworks vendors throughout this Halloween period.

The City of Surrey provides these tips for a safe and fun Halloween:

  • Make sure trick-or-treaters do not criss-cross roads and only cross at marked intersections.
  • Carry a flashlight or glow-stick to make yourself and children more visible.
  • Costumes should be made with reflective material and be made of flame-resistant material.
  • Use LED lights instead of candles in your jack-o-lanterns.
  • Decorations should be kept away from heat sources.
  • Don’t overload electrical cords, outlets, and power bars.
  • “Fake” swords, knives and guns part of your costume? Make sure they look fake, but remember some people still may not be able to tell the difference.
  • Talk to your children about being ‘street smart’ before they go out on their own, or better yet, have an adult or older sibling accompany them.
  • Bring your treats home and inspect them before eating them. Many children suffer from allergies and all spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items should be thrown out.

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