Surrey RCMP OIC Dwayne McDonald

Surrey’s top cop talks to business crowd

Surrey can not arrest its way out of all crime problems, according to RCMP Chief Supt. Dwayne McDonald

Surrey’s top cop stressed intervention, prevention and enforcement as key initiatives in Surrey public safety this week.

Chief Supt. Dwayne McDonald, named Surrey RCMP officer in charge in October, addressed about 100 business people and politicians at the Sheraton Guildford on Tuesday afternoon.

He pointed out there is extremely strong policing in Surrey and said the crime statistics bear that out.

He also noted that some crime appears to be getting more serious, as the Statistics Canada Crime Severity Index shows a climb.

The police, he said, need to be aware of these trends and remain responsive to them.

Enforcement alone is not going to cut it.

“We can’t arrest our way out of this problem,” McDonald said. “The status quo is not going to work for us in the long run.”

Crime, he said, is forever changing and policing needs to change with it.

He said the needed changes might be subtle.

He noted that a pot of water is boiling at 212F and only needs an extra degree to produce steam. Some police initiatives might just need that extra one degree to produce results.

He praised the RCMP’s SMARTT program, designed to help the disadvantaged and vulnerable in this city.

The Surrey RCMP deals with people with “multiple risk factors” that are at great risk of harm.

The program helps people who are homeless, or who have problems of addiction and mental health get the services they need.

“Sixty per cent of the calls (for RCMP service) are related to social issues, not just criminal activity,” McDonald said.

Addressing those issues requires a multi-agency approach and the contribution of partners willing to help with the problem.

McDonald said he greatly appreciated the relationships the RCMP has been able to build with the community in that regard.

“If the police department loses the trust of the community, it doesn’t end well for anybody, and I’m certainly going to endeavour to ensure that doesn’t happen here,” McDonald said.

“Trust isn’t simply earned by us putting out news releases, or giving you facts, it’s about building relationships in the community.”

McDonald said after the meeting that a new initiative is coming for Whalley. While details are few at this point, he said it would be a multi-agency approach to dealing with some of the problems on 135A Street.

McDonald’s presentation came on the heels of two public safety initiatives that were launched on Tuesday.

One, is a new mobile app, a one-stop source for RCMP events, crime mapping, crime prevention and trends.

The other is known as Project IRIS, where the community can register their closed circuit TV cameras for the RCMP database, so the Mounties can better fight crime.

 

Just Posted

Surrey councillor defends SOGI 123 stance after resigning from AutismBC

Laurie Guerra stands by her opposition to SOGI 123 resource as backlash over meeting comes to a head

PHOTOS: Hockey history in Surrey as Team India comes to play

Squad played its very first game in Canada on Tuesday against Surrey Falcons

Proposed coal project for Fraser Surrey Docks back in court

It could be months before the federal appeal court renders a decision

Minor injuries for firefighter struck outside South Surrey fire hall

Minor injuries for firefighter struck outside South Surrey fire hall

Surrey to hear news on Olympic softball qualifier bid next week

Decision, originally expected in September, was delayed by World Baseball Softball Confederation

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Kuhnhackl scores 2 odd goals as Isles dump Canucks 5-2

Vancouver drops second game in two nights

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Disabled boy has ‘forgiven’ bullies who walked on him in stream, mom says

A Cape Breton teen who has cerebral palsy was told to lie in a stream as other kids walked over him

Vancouver man must pay $22,000 after breaking strata rules

Peter Gordon took his fight over his rented condo to the civil resolution tribunal, but lost

Most Read