Three Surrey teachers disciplined over ‘Jar of Death’ food challenge at school camp

Campers were pressured to lick a teacher’s foot, chew gum that had been chewed by another teacher, agency says.

  • Sep. 2, 2016 1:00 p.m.

The Surrey School District Administration office on 92nd Avenue.

SURREY — Three high school teachers who failed to intervene when students organized a “Jar of Death” punishment at a camp have been disciplined by the agency that regulates educators’ conduct in British Columbia.

Campers were pressured to lick a teacher’s foot, chew gum that had been chewed by another teacher and drink a glass of water into which four people had spat, the B.C. commissioner for teacher regulation says in a document recently posted on its website.

Jennifer Robinson, a teacher who is in charge of the PE leadership program at a school in Surrey, was among the supervisors at the annual three-day camp in September 2015, the document says.

Robinson, who was listed as the “educator-in-charge” at the camp, has been suspended for two days in October while two other teachers will serve their one-day suspensions in November.

The consent resolution agreement says students would nominate others who had done something at the camp that they did not like.

“The nominees had to reach into a jar and pull out a piece of paper with a task written on it which they would then be expected to perform in front of the group,” it says.

“At no time did she (Robinson) attempt to put a stop to the activity.”

CLICK HERE to read the document posted to the BCteacherregulation.ca website.

Robinson also did not intervene during a so-called food challenge organized by two Grade 12 students, says the document, which was signed by commissioner Bruce Preston on Aug. 23.

Students were required to eat food drawn randomly from a jar, including minced garlic, baby food and dried squid.

“While some students protested during the challenge, they were pressured by older students to continue to participate,” the document says, adding Robinson was present but did not intervene, saying only that the food had to be edible and could not include peanuts.

Michael Mitro, another teacher at the school, was selected by a male student to be the teacher whose foot would be licked as part of the “Jar of Death” challenge.

“Mitro sat in front of students and staff, and removed his shoe and sock so that the student could then lick his foot,” says the consent resolution agreement in his case, signed by the commissioner on Aug. 11.

A third teacher, Matthew Jones, was chosen by students as the person whose gum would have to be chewed by another student who was being punished.

“Jones took a piece of gum, chewed it, and gave it to the student to complete the challenge,” says the document, also signed by the commissioner on Aug. 11.

All the teachers were issued letters of discipline last December.

Under the agreement with the commissioner, the three teachers admitted that their actions constitute professional misconduct. They also agreed not to make any statement orally or in writing to contradict, dispute or call into question the admissions they have made.

The three teachers were required to complete a course on respectful professional boundaries through the Justice Institute of B.C.

And they acknowledged that the agreement would be published, in accordance with the Teachers Act, on the commissioner’s website.

CP/Vancouver Sun

Just Posted

MPs meet with Surrey council to discuss RCMP, LRT

Federal government to have quarterly meetings with Surrey

Hogg curious if a new recreation centre is needed in Grandview Heights

South Surrey-White Rock MP to host a Town Hall Meeting tonight

Surrey building that has gathered dust for 20 years is for sale again, with bids sought

Potential sale of the long-vacant 104 Avenue Centre is good news, Surrey Board of Trade CEO says

Fluterrific returning to North Delta Rec Centre

The annual flute concert will showcase music from all genres on Sunday, Nov. 18

WATCH: Goalie from North Delta scores in AHL hockey game

Tristan Jarry makes history for Penguins by hitting an empty net

People flocking to Vancouver Island city to see hundreds of sea lions

Each year the combination of Steller and California sea lions take over Cowichan Bay

Regulatory confusion over ‘toxic’ stink near Abbotsford school

Officials sniffing out which regulators responsible for enforcing compliance at neighbouring property

Canadians more prepared for weather disaster than financial one: poll

RBC recommends people check their bank app as often as the weather app

B.C. dog owner sues after pet killed in beaver trap

A Kamloops man is suing the operator of a trapline north of the city after his dog died

Heading soccer balls can cause damage to brain cells: UBC study

Roughly 42 per cent of children in the country play soccer, according to statistics from Heritage Canada

Supreme Court hears case on migrant detainees’ rights to challenge incarceration

Currently, migrants who do not hold Canadian citizenship can only challenge detention through an immigration tribunal or a judicial review.

Canada Post issues new offer to employees as eBay calls on Ottawa to end strikes

Ebay is calling on the federal government to legislate an end to the Canada Post contract dispute, warning that quick action is needed to ensure retailers don’t lose out on critical Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales.

No G20 member has climate plan strong enough to meet Paris targets: report

Canada’s push to be a world leader in the fight against climate change may be hampered by its distinction for producing the most greenhouse gas emissions per person among the world’s 20 largest economies.

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

Most Read