Top earners in Surrey school district revealed

Superintendent Jordan Tinney received more than $346K in total compensation in last fiscal year

The Surrey School District’s top five earners have been revealed in an annual compensation disclosure report.

The totals provided are for the 2017/2018 fiscal year, which ended June 30, 2018.

Superintendent Jordan Tinney was the district’s top earner, who received a $258,993 salary, $8,857 in benefits and $35,662 in pension contributions.

Tinney also received $43,038 in “other compensation,” including $21,365 in vacation payout and $21,673 as a vehicle/transportation allowance.

All told, Tinney’s total compensation for the year was $346,550, up from $334,833 in the prior fiscal year (2016-17) and $298,468 in 2015-16, meaning his compensation has risen $48,082 over that time.

The district reports that “due to the size of the district, the need to visit schools and other district worksites, the requirement to transport out of district individuals, and the need to be available at any time, the Board provides a leased vehicle to the Superintendent, Secretary-Treasurer and Deputy Superintendent.”

“Recognizing the personal use that may be realized, these three individuals reimburse the district one-third of the vehicle leased costs,” the district adds in its report.

Coming in second was Deputy Superintendent Rick Ryan whose total compensation was $248,486 (up from $240,821 in the prior fiscal year). The 2017-18 figure includes $187,896 in salary, $7,022 in benefits, $25,874 in pension contributions, $11,327 in vacation payout and $16,367 for a vehicle/transportation allowance.

Read also: ‘Portable explosion’ continues in Surrey, with district predicting $10.7M bill

See also: Over-budget bids cause delay of five Surrey school projects

Secretary-Treasurer Greg Frank was the third highest earner, receiving $231,401 in total compensation, including $187,372 in salary, $8,505 in benefits, $18,493 in pension contributions and $17,031 in “other compensation,” which was a vehicle/transportation allowance.

Next, was Assistant Superintendent Christy Northway, whose total compensation in 2017-18 was $206,340, including $157,166 in salary, $8,510 in benefits, $21,643 in pension contributions, $13,021 in vacation payout and $6,000 for a vehicle/transportation allowance.

Finally, Assistant Superintendent Catherine Sereda received a total compensation of $198,936 in 2017-18, including a salary of $155,780, $4,848 in benefits, $21,452 in pension contributions, and $16,856 in other compensation (including $10,856 in vacation payout and $6,000 as a vehicle/transportation allowance).

The district is required to submit senior employee compensation documents to the provincial government annually.

In submitting the 2017-18 report, the district wrote that the Surrey Board of Education “encourages and adopts practices that enable the district to attract, retain, incent, and reward qualified, high-performing employees who are critical to the delivery of quality public education programs to students.”

“A key component of this approach is the development and maintenance of a framework for executive and exempt staff compensation that is rational, defensible, competitive and able to be effectively administered,” the document notes.

The Board of Education’s “compensation philosophy is based upon a set of principles that guide development, maintenance and decision-making with respect to salary structures and total compensation packages and programs. At its core is an integrated view of compensation and rewards — not only traditional, quantifiable elements such as salary and benefits (compensation), but also more intangible elements such as career opportunities, learning and career development, work challenge, and supportive culture (rewards).”

The document adds: ”The total rewards compensation program further integrates with plans that establish the board of education’s overall education, business, and human resources strategies and objectives to facilitate the attraction and retention of qualified, experienced, motivated and high-potential employees who are committed to the board’s overarching goal of delivering a high quality public education experience to BC students.”

See also: Construction to begin on new Surrey elementary school

Read more: Frozen, but determined, start to new $33-million South Surrey school

See also: ‘Designated waitlists’ set up for in-catchment students at four Surrey schools



amy.reid@surreynowleader.com

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