Federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May and provincial candidate Adam Olsen appear with B.C. party leader Andrew Weaver at a party event in Victoria

Weaver rejects Greens’ anti-Israel policy

Federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May considering future after members endorse 'Boycott Divest Sanctions' position

B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver has rejected the federal party’s adoption of a policy supporting a boycott and sanctions against Israel, adopted despite objections from federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May.

Weaver issued a statement Tuesday saying the policy resolution should not have been allowed on the convention floor.

“The passage of a policy endorsing Boycott, Divest and Sanctions (BDS) at the Green Party of Canada convention in Ottawa this past weekend represents a significant step away from the values that define the B.C. Green Party,” Weaver said.

“BDS is a politically motivated movement that damages any attempt at peace in the Middle East by assigning blame to one party. It risks increasing tension and does not represent a responsible or thoughtful approach to a difficult international issue.”

Jewish advocacy organization B’nai Brith Canada said the federal party’s decision puts it “beyond the fringe” of Canadian politics.

“Greens have chosen to embrace the policy position of shills for 9/11 conspiracy theories and terror apologists, rather than side with the democratic and environmentally-friendly state of Israel,” said B’nai Brith Canada CEO Michael Mostyn.

May, MP for Saanich-Gulf Islands and the federal party’s only elected member, told CBC radio Tuesday she is considering her future as party leader as a result of the vote.

Weaver, MLA for Oak Bay-Gordon Head and the only provincially elected Green Party member, took over as party leader in 2015 from Adam Olsen, who came close to winning a B.C. seat in Saanich North in 2013.

 

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