File photo A man walks his dog on the White Rock Promenade. Despite the fact dogs aren’t allowed on the waterfront walkway until Oct. 1, people have been bringing their pets down in increasing numbers, says artist Ric Wallace, who sells printed photos on the promenade.

White Rock bylaw increasing dog patrols on promenade

Officers taking public awareness approach over writing violation tickets

Instead of writing violation tickets to people who take their dog to the White Rock Promenade, the city has taken an “educational and awareness” approach in dealing with the issue.

City of White Rock communications manager Farnaz Farrokhi told Peace Arch News via email Wednesday that the city has increased the number of bylaw patrols on the waterfront, but has found no need to issue violation tickets.

“People who do have dogs on the Promenade leave when asked to do so by the Bylaw Enforcement Officers,” Farrokhi wrote to PAN. “Since there is 100% compliance, this means that no tickets have been needed to be issued.”

However, White Rock artist Ric Wallace, who sells printed photographs on the promenade, isn’t satisfied with the city’s handling of the bylaw enforcement.

Wallace emailed city councillors Tuesday a picture of a crate, containing 33 prints, that was apparently urinated on by a dog.

“Dear City of White Rock,” Wallace wrote, “do you want to buy the box shown below ($200) and the 33 prints at $45 each ($1,485) pissed on by a dog on the waterfront where bylaw officers are not writing tickets.

“These prints would look good in your NEW CITY HALL.”

Wallace’s email says that artist and residents are willing to offer $100-$1,000 for videos of dog attacks on the White Rock waterfront.

Confusion over the bylaw, as reported by some people’s comments on the PAN Facebook page, came after a Feb. 11 PAN article that had the headline Dogs allowed on White Rock Promenade during off-season.

Although the article reported that the one-year trial period didn’t begin until Oct. 1, some readers appear to have missed that piece of information.

However, not all people who commented on the PAN Facebook page seemed deterred by the city’s animal control bylaw.

“I take my dogs there no matter what time of day! The people that don’t like dogs walk around. The people that do just love them and want to pet them.

“I will continue to do that,” a PAN reader wrote.

To increase public awareness about the issue, Farrokhi said the city took out an advertisement in Friday’s PAN, and added public awareness posts on the city’s social media platforms.

“This information was also in our previous e-newsletter and it will be in upcoming editions.

“We have scheduled more social media posts for the coming weeks as well.”

Leashed dogs will be allowed on the promenade from Oct. 1, 2019 to March 31.

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