Addiction: Finding healing and hope

I am changing my life through the WelcomeHome addiction recovery program.

As a counsellor and female program director at the WelcomeHome Addiction Recovery Academy in Surrey, each and every day I witness women striving for growth, internalizing a new way of living, and utilizing every ounce of their being to conquer their old lifestyle, mindset, and behaviours.

These women are faced with immense struggles involving shame, guilt, resentment, and abandonment. They acknowledge they are broken and ill-equipped to successfully navigate life’s challenges, but I see a heart-felt passion for change and a determination for success.

Two clients wanted to share their experience with Leader readers.

(Their names have been withheld to protect their privacy).

Although very different in appearance and personality, both of these women share a keen awareness of who they once were and the deep desire to shed that persona to truly become the best that they can be. By implementing the tools provided, they are developing into strong, inspiring, passionate advocates for other women who struggle with addiction.

I can earnestly say that there is no better place for individuals to obtain healing and hope from the bondage of addiction. I consider it a privilege to walk alongside the recovery journeys of these women who have committed to changing their lives.

To observe the emotional, physical, and psychological transformations of these participants is not work, but rather, an honour.

 

Rikki R. Fryatt, Clinical Counsellor/Female Program Director

WelcomeHome Addiction Recovery Academy

 

http://www.welcomehomesociety.org/

http://www.facebook.com/welcomehomesociety

 

Reclaimed my life

 

I’m an addict. I joined the WelcomeHome addiction recovery program a little over a year ago because my reality was complete chaos and out of control.

At that time, my end in sight looked like homelessness, jail, or death. What’s worse is that I felt no remorse or care about that. It did not concern me that I put myself and others, including my family, in danger on a regular basis. I didn’t care how my behaviours affected others either, because I gave up on my life and pushed everyone who cared about me as far away as I could so I didn’t have to change.

To everyone I knew, I lied, manipulated, stole, cheated on, and disrespected. I hated myself and my life. I was so resistant to face myself that I numbed my life away, being intoxicated from early morning until late at night, year after year.

I was careless, I had no limits, and I did many things I swore I never would.

But that’s what addiction does. It takes you to dark places and makes them comfortable.

Since I’ve come to WelcomeHome, I’m a new woman, but I’m not alone. I have friends and people who care about me and I’m earning trust from my family back.

Today, I do everything differently from my life before. I ask for help. I rely on others and have become reliable and responsible. I accept that I make mistakes, I have flaws, and I’m not a bad person. I can face my life without fear and I’m proactive to make changes and do my best.

I’ve gained self-respect, assertiveness, self-worth, and the ability to choose to do the right thing in all situations.

I’ve reclaimed my life and have a bright promising future that I can do anything I set my mind to. It’s the best decision I’ve ever made, and I hope others struggling will do the same.

 

M.

 

Power to succeed lies within

 

Choices… They all add up.

I was living in a fog. From the age of 13, addiction ruled my life. I gave up everything I had for my next fix, right down to my body. I rejected my family and all those who cared. I was alone, just hoping and waiting to die.

In and out of foster homes, safe houses, detox, and the street, I was selfish and miserable. I put my family in danger and broke their hearts without a care. I spiralled faster downward, every day.

Overdoses, cold, blue-in-the-face. Hospitals, solemn promises to stop using… broken promises. There was always a small glimmer of hope that there was something better out there. I was just too lazy to do the work.

I am 20 years old now and I am changing my life through the WelcomeHome addiction recovery program. I’ve been in other treatment centres, and nothing I tried ever worked. Here, I am held accountable to do the work for my recovery. A better life is not just handed to you.

I finally feel like I am going somewhere. I am finding ways to enjoy every moment of life and be happy no matter what life throws my way.

The power to succeed lies within me. I want to thank all who support my recovery and encourage others to change their life.

 

N.

Surrey North Delta Leader

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Video tribute to KPU’s spring grad class also honours Andrew Petter, Bill Wright

‘We still want to celebrate our graduates, their achievements, and their resilience’

Surrey baseball association loses ‘a true giant’ in Bruce Lawson

Longtime volunteer ‘always gave his heart and soul to Surrey Canadian and the game of baseball’

Surrey School District forecasts up to 30 per cent of students will return to class this week

Education Minister Rob Fleming said on June 1, about 60,000 B.C. children returned to school

Clover Valley Beer Festival cancelled

Cloverdale beer fest falls victim to COVID-19

South Surrey’s Darts Hill Garden Park to re-open – by appointment

City of Surrey-run garden will be open to visitors Thursday through Saturday

B.C. records four new COVID-19 cases, Abbotsford hospital outbreak cleared

Four senior home outbreaks also declared over, eight still active

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

We’re asking you to lock arms with us, as we look to better days ahead

RCMP, coroner investigate murder-suicide on Salt Spring Island

Two dead, police say there is no risk to the public

About 30% of B.C. students return to schools as in-class teaching restarts amid pandemic

Education minister noted that in-class instruction remains optional

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

B.C.’s Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics goes virtual

The annual event partnering RCMP with Special Olympians is dramatically altered by COVID-19

Bateman program encourages people to sketch outside, connect with nature

#MyNatureSketch initiative encourages Canadians to become ‘bright-eyed three year olds’

Be cautious expanding COVID-19 bubble, Dr. Bonnie Henry tells B.C.

Senior homes stay off-limits as schools, businesses reopen

Most Read