Canada’s multiculturalism a living example of peace and freedom

Many Canadians have sacrificed their lives in the line of duty for these very beliefs.

Canada takes pride as a country made up of a cultural mosaic. Living in Canada, people from all walks of life are very fortunate to be living in this multiculturally diverse country.

Like every year, Remembrance Day falls on the eleventh day of the month. This year, Diwali, which many may know is one of the most important religious festivals of the year for Sikhs, Hindus and Jains across the world, fell on one of the most solemn occasions of the year – Remembrance Day.

The Diwali festival date changes according to the lunar calendar every year.

Growing up following the Sikh religion, I have been celebrating Diwali for as long as I can remember. Considering the significance of both occasions, I am extremely thankful to be born and raised in such an accepting and diverse country that values the importance of religion and diversity.

Fireworks are a major part of celebrating Diwali since it is the celebration of lights. However, many Sikh and Hindu festival organizers in the Lower Mainland were reluctant to celebrate this occasion in such a manner in respect for Remembrance Day. Despite this, they were still given permission to use fireworks.

I pay my respect and gratitude to the fallen soldiers who died in the line of duty. Canada’s efforts have always been driven by the commitment to foster peace and freedom.

Many Canadians have sacrificed their lives in the line of duty for these very beliefs. Their sacrifices have not gone in vain. Rather, Canada’s multiculturalism is a living example of their dream of peace and freedom and the future they believed in.

Thank you, Canada.

 

Navi Dosanjh, Surrey

 

 

 

 

 

 

To u from poem

Surrey North Delta Leader