COLUMN: Civic seats look safe for gas tax hike proponents

Drivers in the Surrey, Delta and White Rock areas will join others within the TransLink service area in paying two cents more in gas tax, likely starting early next year.

The boost to the gas tax was agreed to by mayors representing a majority of residents in the Lower Mainland on Friday. They included Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts and White Rock Mayor Catherine Ferguson. Delta Mayor Lois Jackson voted against the additional taxes.

Watts joined with Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson and several other mayors earlier in the week to state that they would back the tax increase because they do not want to see the Evergreen Line in the Tri-City area shelved. TransLink had to come up with $400 million for its share of the line’s construction, and federal funding for the project would be eliminated without that commitment.

Watts also said transit service in the South Fraser area would improve as a result of the gas tax increase and a planned $23 increase in TransLink property taxes on the average home.

There are several key points which need emphasis. The most important one was made by Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan, who opposed the latest gas tax increase. His point is that TransLink keeps running out of cash and going back to taxpayers every year or two, even when it says it won’t need to.

This has been TransLink’s history from day one. It has never had enough taxing authority to fulfill its mandate of maintaining and adding to transit service. Its other mandate, to help maintain regional arterial roads, has been fulfilled – but that is a small part of its overall budget.

Watts and other mayors optimistically think that the current provincial government (Christy Clark is the fourth premier to deal with TransLink) will actually grant the agency more taxing power. I’m not so sure. The track record of previous premiers suggests it won’t, and the current government is in a deep fiscal hole, made deeper by the rejection of the HST by voters.

Another point to remember is this: The Evergreen Line has been promised for more than two decades. It has continually been shelved to make room for other initiatives driven by the provincial and federal governments – notably the Canada Line and the Millennium Line. What is to say that another initiative, such as a SkyTrain line to UBC, won’t elbow the Evergreen Line aside again?

Another important point is that taxpayers, particularly those south of the Fraser, are being asked to  pay more by almost everybody. The provincial government will be imposing tolls on all those who use the new Port Mann Bridge, starting next year.

When that is coupled with the added gas tax, drivers in Surrey who use the new bridge will be paying substantially more to get to work each year. Yet they are getting little in return.

And one other interesting observation: The mayors most supportive of this tax boost are those who have minimal challenges in November’s election. Watts may well be elected by acclamation – as yet, she has no announced rival. Ferguson isn’t running again. Jackson, on the other hand, has three challengers seeking her job.

• In last week’s column, I stated that RCMP members do not get overtime pay. I was incorrect – they do get paid overtime.

Frank Bucholtz is the editor of The Langely Times. He writes weekly for The Leader.

newsroom@langleytimes.com

Surrey North Delta Leader

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