Transportation, parkland and LRT promise to be hot election issues in Surrey next year. (Now-Leader file photo)

Transportation, parkland and LRT promise to be hot election issues in Surrey next year. (Now-Leader file photo)

COLUMN: Next year’s election campaign has already begun in Surrey

Transportation, parkland and the LRT promise to be hot election issues

To no one’s surprise, Surrey council recently approved a road through Hawthorne Park.

It’s not that the proposal wasn’t controversial – it was, it is and it will be. The vote was due to Surrey’s single-minded commitment to have an LRT line built between City Centre and Guildford; the fact that every member of council is part of the Surrey First team; and a determination to ignore any and all arguments against the plan, no matter how reasonable they were.

Opponents booed and hissed as council approved the plan (see video below) and have vowed to make the road an election issue. The alternate approval process used by the city to determine if the park designation should be removed from the land that will be used to build 105th Avenue was deeply flawed, and members of council were well aware of that.

Nonetheless, that was the only concession they were willing to make to democracy.

One year from now, there will be a civic election. Unlike 2014, when she rode Dianne Watts’ coattails into office, Mayor Linda Hepner will have to stand on her own record.

Her Surrey First party won’t be able to depend on donations from developers to steamroll opposition candidates, as the province is severely limiting the amount that can be donated to campaigns.

Hepner will undoubtedly cite her leadership on LRT, a project she desperately hopes will at least start by the time the vote occurs. In 2014, she promised the line would be all but complete by that time.

What she won’t talk about is how she and council ignored concerns about cutting a popular North Surrey park in two, or how the construction period will all but eliminate use of the park for an extended period. Nor will she acknowledge that one of the main reasons 105th Avenue has to be built (in council’s mind, at least) is that 104th Avenue is being reduced to a two-lane road for most of its length between King George Boulevard and 152nd Street.

This will begin almost as soon as construction starts on the LRT line, and the two lanes will remain long after the LRT line is complete.

This will lead to monumental traffic jams there and increased congestion on 100th Avenue (where the city has already cut down hundreds of trees to widen the road) and 108th Avenue.


The precedent set by extending 105th Avenue and cutting through a park will be followed if council gets its way and builds a second phase of LRT down Fraser Highway. The Green Timbers forest will be hacked away on each side of Fraser Highway to accommodate the corridor.

There are some residents who are perfectly content with the city cutting a road through a park, and ignoring the voices of neighbours who will be most deeply affected. Others are indifferent, most likely because they do not live in the neighbourhood and have never been to the park.

For those who have paid attention to this issue, the council vote has stiffened their resolve to change the way things are done in Surrey. It will be an uphill battle, but the best time to start to make change is during an election campaign.

Most people won’t recognize it, but the 2018 campaign has already begun.

Frank Bucholtz writes Fridays for the Now-Leader.

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