Dismayed by Conservative performance

Candidates try unsuccessfully to sell the party line.

I was disappointed by the Conservative performance at the all-candidates meeting hosted by Panorama Neighbourhood Association on Oct. 4, which was, frankly, dismal.

And it was a performance, featuring transparent rhetoric and parroted lines delivered almost apologetically

Dean Drysdale and Harpreet Singh started off in okay form, Drysdale having gone around to shake everyone’s hand before the debate began. But they ducked and muddled their way through questions about agriculture, finances and crime. When asked about mental health, Drysdale passed on the question, admitting that he knew too little about it to say anything of value.

His comments about the universal childcare benefit elicited shocked exclamations, grumbles of disbelief, and shaking heads from the audience. He seems to think that it would tear families apart and force them to enroll their children at childcare facilities. He added he disapproved of having children raised by “strangers” and praised Canadians for their ability to work around the lack of universal childcare by playing Tetris with work shifts or getting Grandma to raise the kids. Cries of “what about single parents” and similar comments were disregarded.

Perhaps the most offensive moment occurred when the subject of Bill C-24 came up. When asked if he would disavow Stephen Harper’s “old-stock Canadian” comment, Drysdale gave a long-winded no. He said that he thought the term was an appropriate description and seemed exasperated that the media was making such a big deal about it.

Singh added that he approved of the legislation because it only applies to terrorists and those committing high treason. Anyone who isn’t a terrorist, he implied, shouldn’t be concerned about the bill.

Neither of them seemed willing or able to understand how the bill might possibly create two classes of citizenship.

The sight of the Conservative candidates trying to sell the party line to an audience that had started out open minded but ended up mostly unsympathetic, their faces carefully blank as they gave increasingly scripted and vague answers, was almost amusing. Less amusing is the fact that some people are still going to vote for them on Oct. 19.

 

Sylvia Traphan, Surrey

 

Just Posted

Stabbing at Surrey banquet hall sends man to hospital

RCMP says victim has ‘non-life threatening’ injuries, incident still under investigation

55-year-old man taken to hospital after fire at Surrey RV park

Firefighters find man suffering from smoke inhalation, burns to face and hands: battalion chief

South Surrey parking ticket perplexes, frustrates

Theresa Delaney predicts more people will be wrongly ticketed

OUR VIEW: Let’s find Surrey pellet-gun punks

Those who do have information – if they are also possessed of a conscience – must contact police

Coldest Night an event for warm hearts

Sources’ White Rock event one of 130 walkathons across Canada on Feb. 23

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. VIEWS: Power politics wins over rational energy policy

B.C Hydro continues to face interference on rates

PR firm suspends contract with former B.C. premier amid groping accusation

Edelman says in a statement that Campbell has served as a special adviser to the firm since last July

Vancouver crash leaves driver dead, 2 in hospital

Police are investigating what happened in 2-vehicle crash

James says B.C. budget puts priorities on NDP’s poverty, environment plans

She said she expected the government’s poverty reduction and climate change strategies to be priorities in the budget

Vancouver Giants blank Rockets

Langley-based G-men take over top spot in the west

PHOTOS: Day 1 of the 2019 Canada Winter Games in Red Deer

Games kicked off in Red Deer this week

Ammonia leak shuts down curling club in Nelson

It’s not yet clear when the leak was detected

Most Read