A letter writer suggests that making sure older people’s smoke alarms are in working order would be ‘child’s play’ for today’s technologically savvy youth.

A letter writer suggests that making sure older people’s smoke alarms are in working order would be ‘child’s play’ for today’s technologically savvy youth.

Hey grandkids: Check seniors’ smoke alarm

Young folks would find it easy to ensure their grandparents' fire alarms are in working order.

Re: “Death of seniors partly due to failed smoke alarm: Report,” The Leader, Oct. 3.

My wife and I are both senior citizens with smoke alarms in our basement, bedrooms, and two in our hallway. Two because one is hard-wired and will not work if we have a power failure. The other one is a the typical nine-volt battery-operated unit.

On reading this story, I checked out all of our smoke detectors.

Some things to watch for are steady or flashing green lights on the battery-operated units. Most smoke alarms come with a push-button that gives a beep if it is still working. Others are even guaranteed for 10 years.

If the smoke alarm gives out a chirping sound that is annoying your wife, it probably is telling you to change the nine-volt battery.

If children can run a computer, iPhone or iPad, checking out their grandparents’ smoke alarms would be child’s play – and could save a life.

 

Fred Perry

Surrey

Surrey North Delta Leader