Don’t even think of running the fool’s gauntlet this New Year’s weekend. (Photo: Flickr)

Don’t even think of running the fool’s gauntlet this New Year’s weekend. (Photo: Flickr)

OUR VIEW: Drinking and driving would be tragic way to end 2017

You have the power in you to not be the driver responsible for another roadside monument

A white wooden cross is mounted on a telephone pole on the southwest corner of 80th Avenue and Scott Road, dedicated to 12-year-old Clifford Wright, who was killed by a drunk driver.

Clifford’s family had been heading to Safeway to get some Ding Dongs, his favourite treat, when a drunk driver broadsided their van. Clifford was thrown through a passenger window and into the front end of a pickup truck.

You have the power in you to not be the drunk driver responsible for yet another heartbreaking roadside monument. Don’t let tragedy be your calling card.

Don’t even think of running the fool’s gauntlet this New Year’s weekend. Even if it’s only a city block between yourself and the pub, or your best pal’s party, it’s still enough distance to kill someone – maybe even yourself – if you’re drunk and dumb enough to get behind the wheel. That goes for all you pot smokers, too.

On New Year’s Eve, on average, one person is killed and 170 people are injured in 620 crashes across the province, ICBC says. Of these, 120 people are injured in 410 crashes in the Lower Mainland.

Chief Constable Neil Dubord, chairman of B.C.’s Association of Chiefs of Police Traffic Safety Committee, probably says it best.

“We don’t want to have to inform any families that they’ve just lost their loved one this New Year’s Eve,” he says.

“There’s no excuse. If you’re planning to drink, leave your car at home.”

Amen to that.



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