Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum says residents don’t want ride-hailing – he knows this because he’s been out talking to people in the community. Which community is that, we ask? (Now-Leader and Flikr photos)

Opinion

OUR VIEW: McCallum’s futile crusade against Uber is embarrassing for Surrey

Mayor’s claim that majority of residents don’t want ride-hailing is simply laughable

“Completely wrong.”

“Entrapment.”

“Pure silliness.”

Indeed, Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum’s tactics to keep Uber out of Surrey – not to mention his crusade against ride-hailing in the first place – were being met with scorn and ridicule Monday.

McCallum told media Monday that 18 infraction warnings were handed out to Uber drivers since Friday. He also said there will be no more warnings – if caught operating in Surrey, they will be fined $500.

All this tough talk comes after the city sent a letter to Uber Friday telling it to cease its operations, which Uber shrugged off and “declined.”

It’s no secret who the mayor is looking out for here. We all know his supporters in the taxi industry played a big role in putting him in office a second time in Surrey.

SEE MORE: Surrey bylaw’s tactics with Uber drivers deemed ‘entrapment’ and ‘completely wrong’

While it’s understandable that McCallum would act to protect the jobs of an industry that helped land him the mayor’s seat, it’s also easy to see why he would be criticized for ignoring the wishes of the city as a whole.

But if you ask him, he would tell you he isn’t ignoring residents at all, rather, he is listening to them.

“A large majority of our residents do not support ride-hailing in Surrey,” McCallum has previously stated, even being quoted as saying he knows this because he has been out in the community speaking to residents.

We have to wonder, which community was that?

Read page 7 in tomorrow’s issue of the Now-Leader and then try to tell us Surrey doesn’t want ride-hailing. Furthermore, of the many letters we have received, not one has been in support of McCallum’s ill-advised war with Uber.

And among the hundreds of comments on our Facebook and Twitter, we could only find a few that didn’t want ride-hailing.

Finally, while hardly scientific, 82 per cent of the 3,117 people who took our web poll (take it below) said they want ride-hailing.

For a slate that promised to listen to residents, it’s clear Safe Surrey is tone deaf – or is plugging its ears – when it comes to ride-hailing in Surrey.

Either way, it’s not a good look.

– Now-Leader




edit@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow us on Twitter

City of SurreyTransportationUber

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Love flourishes at Peace Arch Park, but COVID-19 concerns loom

South Surrey park becomes only place for international couples to meet

Human Rights Tribunal denies church’s request to toss out White Rock Pride Society’s complaint

Star of the Sea and White Rock Pride Society to go to Human Rights Tribunal hearing

UPDATE: Missing 12-year-old boy found, Surrey RCMP say

Landon Vangeel-Morgan was last seen 9:14 p.m., May 30 near 96 Avenue and 150 Street

COVID-19: Daily update on pandemic in Surrey, White Rock and beyond

Provincial Health Officer officially bans overnight kids’ camps this summer

Surrey RCMP look for missing man

Tyler Ridout, 36, last seen near Balsam Crescent and 136th Street

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

We’re asking you to lock arms with us, as we look to better days ahead

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

‘We’re sick of it’: Anger over police killings shatters U.S.

Tens of thousands marched to protest the death of George Floyd

Most Read