Roses and Rotten Tomatoes (Sept. 29, 2016)

Our weekly feature gives readers a chance to vent about things that enrage them - or to thank a certain someone who made their day

Roses

  • Roses to the young men who do the receiving of goods at Value Village.  They are always smiling and pleasant while taking your donation.
  • Baskets of special fresh roses to two wonderful ladies who thoughtfully and selflessly adorn our office lunchroom table with baskets of delicious fresh fruit, keeping us all healthy. Thank you so much! It’s people like you who make the angels sing.
  • Roses to my amazing two kids!
  • Starburst-coloured roses to tuneful guitarists everywhere — even bass guitarists, heh heh. No matter if you’re playing classical music or jazz, you rock.
  • Roses to my mom and dad for all they did and do.
  • Smartly arranged roses to those who are able to form cogent arguments and express them with grace, magnanimity and élan. You and your kind are becoming rarer by the minute.
  • A single red rose to be shared by Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton for the entertainment value they provided to millions during their first presidential debate on Monday night. Next round what say, water balloons?

Email your Roses to edit@thenownewspaper.com

Rotten Tomatoes

  • Rotten tomatoes to crazy drivers who cut people off and drive too fast in dangerous situations. We all have to share the same roads, why do you endanger people’s lives?  Memo: the brake is the big pedal, not the small one.
  • Rotten tomatoes to ignorant people who have problems with barking dogs. If it bothers you so much, go live somewhere where they don’t allow them.
  • Rotten tomatoes to the driver who almost ran me over on 159th and Venture Way as I was crossing the street. People like you don’t deserve to have a licence!
  • Rotten tomatoes to the pharmacist who was rude to me just because I didn’t know what hormones mean. Rude people like you don’t belong in the medical field.
  • Rotten tomatoes to the City of Surrey’s transportation and Engineering departments for their thoughtless planning of road work. By scheduling work starting 8 a.m. on weekdays, they inconvenience people trying to drop kids off to school and/or commute to work. Why can’t they start doing lane closures at 9 a.m. when traffic has eased up? Eight is also too early for the traffic flaggers as they seem to be more interested in their hair, coffee and cell phones at that hour.

Email your Rotten Tomatoes to edit@thenownewspaper.com

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