Surrey kids used in political game

Time for trustees to make some real noise on behalf of 71,000-plus students.

Re: A recent column by Frank Bucholtz, “Surrey a key school sector,” it is interesting to see Surrey Board of Education Chairperson Shawn Wilson say, “It’s very clear that government is actively trying hard to develop ways to help us find capital. I think if we manage things a bit better and cut through the red tape” there would be improvement.

I think the staff of Surrey School District have done an excellent job of managing “things” over the years and there is no question the students and families of Surrey deserve capital funding now – as they did 10, 15 and 20 years ago. I could go on, but this provincial government and the ones that came before them have not given Surrey School District what it needs and it is now a game of catch-up.

The trustees have been asking for new schools for years and it is time the on the Surrey school board took a stand. Yes, the district is caught in the middle of the middle of the “development at all costs” mayor and city council, and the “make money for the rich” provincial government, but it is time trustees made some real noise on behalf of the 71,000 and counting students in the Surrey School District.

If and when there is a new plan,  it will be heavily weighted on the value the B.C. Liberals have on MLA seats they currently hold in Surrey and if they think they require more to become government again. It is so unfortunate that the education of our children, our future, is used in this political game.

The School District has played the current required game set out by the Ministry of Education very well. As Trustee Laurae McNally stated, the game changes regularly. They have moved and reduced choice programs, changed boundaries of over-crowed schools, disrupting many students and families along the way, all in the name of making neighbourhood schools more accessible for neighbourhood students.

I fully support neighbourhood schools for neighbourhood students, but the question is, with the never-ending problem of overcrowded schools, do the trustees and staff really think that is a reality?

 

Charlene Dobie

Just Posted

Surrey Central SkyTrain Station upgrades completed

It’s the seventh station along Expo Line to see upgrades completed. Construction began in March 2017

Semiahmoo Trail students surpass Coldest Night fundraising goal

Rocco Forte and his team are third-year participants in Saturday’s Coldest Night of the Year walk

Tardi and team playoff bound in junior curling worlds tonight

Friday night Team Canada’s men’s team faces off against Norway, hoping to secure a spot in the finals

Surrey students learn the ins and outs of business through workers’ co-operative

Mentors work with youth in voluntary after-school program

Pink Shirt Day a reminder to ‘T.H.I.N.K.’ before posting on social media

‘Be Kind’ message on shirts sold for anti-bullying activities of Wednesday, Feb. 27

Man sentenced to 7 years for smuggling drugs and shooting at border guards in Sumas

Nathan Hall was arrested in Abbotsford in 2013 after day-long manhunt

No treatment for highly infectious measles, says doctor

10 cases of measles confirmed in Vancouver as of Friday

Two more measles cases confirmed in Vancouver

It brings the number of total cases within the city connected to the outbreak to ten

B.C. Special Olympics officially underway in Vernon

Athlete’s Oath: “Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.”

Vancouver Aquarium wants your help to name a baby killer whale

The public helped name Springer’s first calf, Spirit, and is being asked to help with the second

Guards protest firing of fellow officers charged with assault at B.C. prison

Corrections officers demonstrated in Maple Ridge on Friday afternoon

Skier dies at Revelstoke Mountain Resort

Cause of death for young man has not been released

R. Kelly charged with 10 counts of sexual abuse

R&B star has been accused of sexual misconduct involving women and underage girls for years

Most Read