When it comes to spending tax dollars

Taking a back seat to concrete

Premier's Massey bridge plans have a host of problems.

Re: “New bridge will replace tunnel: Clark,” The Leader, Sept. 24.

Premier Christy Clark fails to mention the significant additional space and construction that will be required in order to attempt to relieve some of the massive congestion of traffic in the George Massey Tunnel area, to go along with the wafting coal dust clouds and loss of much-needed Delta and Richmond farmland – all in exchange for a larger port if great increases in coal imports come to fruition.

In such a likely scenario, a healthy environment is once again supposed to take a back seat to extremely large coal extractions and shipping, creating transport corridor nightmares.

 

Frank G. Sterle, Jr.

White Rock

 

Spend money more wisely

 

This week, Premier Christy Clark announced that a new bridge will replace the George Massey Tunnel. Clark states that congestion at the tunnel is frustrating for families and is stalling the economy, adding a new bridge will improve travel times for transit, commuters and commercial users, and open the corridor up to future rapid transit options.

Time and time again, Ms. Clark has announced mega-projects, many P3s, guaranteeing long-term profit. Sadly, while money can be found for bridges and making a four-lane highway to Prince George, the provincial government is ordering TransLink to cinch its belt.

HandyDART, which provides a vital link to society for seniors and disabled people, has had its service hours cut by TransLink and that money given to taxis.

Clark claims to understand the frustration of families when it comes to commuting by car, but is blind to the frustration of thousands of HandyDART users and their families refused rides and forced into taxis. In desperation, TransLink is trying to stem a tsunami with a Band-aid.

It costs less to care for healthy people. HandyDART is an integral part of keeping people healthy. Safe public transportation for all is not a burden, it is a savings. Taxpayers do not object to their money spent wisely.

 

Mark Beeching, Langley

Surrey North Delta Leader

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