W e need the arts

Not everyone is born with the natural skills to excel in the maths and sciences.

I have a question for columnist Tom Fletcher (re: “Swapping sociology for socket sets,” The Leader, Sept. 25). If post-secondary students are discouraged from taking English and sociology programs, then who is going to teach the English classes and provide the much-needed social services to those British Columbians that require them? Or become journalists who write articles in local newspapers?

Certainly not the engineering students who are busy making robots for science fairs.

Not everyone is born with the natural skills to excel in the maths and sciences. In my case, I would not be able to pass a calculus or physics class if my life depended on it.

The real reason that many arts graduates cannot find full-time work is that short-sighted politicians continue to devalue the arts, as evidenced by the severe budget cuts in the arts and community social services sectors in the past few years. Arts and community social services programs cannot survive on the generosity of volunteers alone. Everyone needs to get paid a living wage as part of being valued members in a progressive society.

The time has come to value everyone’s contribution, whether they are scientists or social service workers.

Adele Cameron

Surrey North Delta Leader