Beyond the healthcare challenges, COVID has also vastly changed the hospital’s fundraising landscape. The suspension of traditional fundraisers has left a gap in funding when the hospital is under unprecedented pressure.

Beyond the healthcare challenges, COVID has also vastly changed the hospital’s fundraising landscape. The suspension of traditional fundraisers has left a gap in funding when the hospital is under unprecedented pressure.

Trio of initiatives shine light on vital healthcare needs at Surrey Memorial Hospital

The holiday season is a time to share joy and hope

While our collective attention remains understandably focused on COVID, it doesn’t diminish our community’s numerous other healthcare needs, from cancer surgeries to paediatric care.

As a COVID Care Centre also home to a busy Children’s Health Centre and vital Surgical Care Centre, this is nowhere more apparent than at Surrey Memorial Hospital.

Beyond the healthcare challenges, COVID has also vastly changed the hospital’s fundraising landscape. The suspension of traditional fundraisers has left a gap in funding when the hospital is under unprecedented pressure.

“While we’ve seen the incredible resilience of people and their capacity to find really creative ways of helping, we hope those who are able will continue their support for our hometown healthcare heroes and essential care workers during the season of giving,” says Jane Adams, Executive Director of the Surrey Memorial Hospital Foundation.

Donations for all aspects of the hospital are always welcome and encouraged, however the Foundation is currently focusing on three key areas that reflect Surrey Memorial’s roles.

First, the impact of COVID-19 has been significant. While we’re fortunate in Canada that the government provides critical equipment like ventilators for those most seriously ill, fighting the virus has sparked many additional needs, from specialized equipment to support for healthcare workers.

The Foundation’s COVID-19 Response Fund continues to be instrumental in supporting Surrey Memorial as a major COVID centre.

Just last week, three pieces of life-saving equipment, including a high-tech transportation monitor, were purchased with the funds. This is above the $800,000 of vital equipment already purchased and another $175,000 invested into COVID-related research.

“We are very grateful for our COVID support. It’s resulted in Surrey having some of the best COVID outcomes in the world. But, as the only hospital serving BC’s fastest-growing city, we also have other needs that need to be addressed,” Adams says, pointing to the Foundation’s other two key initiatives: the Children’s Health Centre and “Operation Unstoppable,” a $10-million partnership with Fraser Health to renew Surrey Memorial’s Surgical Centre.

With one-third of Surrey’s population under age 19, and the Fraser Health Region home to 43 per cent of B.C.’s children, it’s no surprise that the number of Children’s Health Centre patients has more than quadrupled in the last 20 years.

“We are the Children’s Health Centre for the Fraser Health Region and one of only two paediatric emergency departments in B.C.,” Adams notes.

“Our Campaign to renovate our Children’s Health Centre is underway and we still need $500,000 to get it over the finish line. We’ve already completed our outdoor play area, rebuilt our children’s cancer treatment area, and added a dedicated pre/post-surgery care area. Next on our radar is the clinic area, housing 14 rooms, a comfortable family waiting area, and an augmented reality system to guide, educate and comfort children and families. We’ll also be updating our 20 patient rooms and adding a child-friendly woodland theme throughout.”

This holiday season, a campaign donation will help local children receive the care they need, close to home.

“In the season of giving when we focus on the joy of children, a monthly donation of just $20 makes a huge difference. ” Adams reflects.

The third essential piece of the Foundation’s current fundraising initiative is Operation Unstoppable, a $10-million modernization of the hospital’s 10 operating rooms. With three ORs complete, the final $5 million of the campaign will complete this vital updating of the region’s busiest surgical centre, where surgeons performed 21,240 surgeries last year – 60 per cent cancer-related.

Modernizing the remaining suites will allow the hospital to continue addressing waitlists created during COVID, attract and retain top surgical talent and ultimately provide residents with the best surgical care possible.

Help spread joy this holiday season: donate securely online today.

Philanthropy

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Doses of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine. (AP Photo/Ron Harris)
Fraser Health adds 4 first-come-first-serve vaccination clinics to Surrey

First 1,000 people to show up to receive vaccine

Surrey Eagles head coach Cam Keith has signed a three-year contract extension with the team. (Garrett James photo)
Surrey Eagles head coach Cam Keith inks 3-year extension with BCHL club

Keith led team to a 17-2-1 record in BCHL’s 20-game ‘pod’ season

The leadership team at Johnston Heights Secondary is looking to raise money for the Canadian Cancer Society through the Relay for Life, planned as an online and in-person event (following COVID-19 restrictions) for the week of June 1 to 7.
Pushed back a year, Surrey students well on their way to Relay for Life fundraising goal

Johnston Heights Leadership Team aims to raise $6,500 for Canadian Cancer Society

Surrey RCMP in the 4900-block of 148th Street, a short road just off of King George Boulevard, on May 15, 2021 after a male was allegedly assaulted with a “pipe-like” weapon that morning. (Photo: Shane MacKichan)
Surrey RCMP investigating after person reportedly injured with ‘pipe-like’ weapon

Police investigating incident in the 4900-block of 148th Street

Conservation Service Officer Kyle Bueckert holds a gold eagle that was revived from acute rodent poisoning Monday, May 12. Photo: Submitted
‘Obviously, he’s a fighter’: Golden eagle, recovered from poisoning, back in Kootenay wild

CSO Kyle Bueckert released the eagle into the wild Thursday, May 13

Capt. Jenn Casey died in a crash just outside of Kamloops, B.C., on May 17, 2020. (CF Snowbirds)
Snowbirds to honour Capt. Casey, who died in B.C. crash, in 2021 tour

Tour will kick off in Ontario in June before heading west

A pedestrian wearing a mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 is bundled up for the cold weather as snow falls in downtown Vancouver on Saturday, February 13, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Snow possible in mountain passes as cold front hits southern B.C.

Much of B.C.’s southern interior will see temperatures plunge from highs of 30 C reached over the weekend

B.C. Wildfire Services shows a fire on Chehalis Forest Service Road as of Sunday, May 16, 2021. (BC Fire Services)
Wildfire near Harrison Mills grows to 3 hectares, BC Fire Service on site

Resident near wildfire: ‘I pray that the Creator brings rain as soon as possible’

A vial of AstraZeneca vaccine is seen at a mass COVID-19 vaccination clinic in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, April 22, 2021. Dr. Ben Chan remembers hearing the preliminary reports back in March of blood clots appearing in a handful of European recipients of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Science on COVID, VITT constantly changing: A look at how doctors keep up

While VITT can represent challenges as a novel disorder, blood clots themselves are not new

Police tape is shown in Toronto Tuesday, May 2, 2017. Statistics Canada says the country's crime rate ticked up again in 2018, for a fourth year in a row, though it was still lower than it was a decade ago. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy
CRIME STOPPERS: ‘Most wanted’ for the week of May 16

Crime Stoppers’ weekly list based on information provided by police investigators

Poached trees that were taken recently on Vancouver Island in the Mount Prevost area near Cowichan, B.C. are shown on Sunday, May 10, 2021. Big trees, small trees, dead trees, softwoods and hardwoods have all become valuable targets of tree poachers in British Columbia as timber prices hit record levels. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jen Osborne.
Tree poaching from public forests increasing in B.C. as lumber hits record prices

Prices for B.C. softwood lumber reached $1,600 for 1,000 board feet compared with about $300 a year ago

The warm weather means time for a camping trip, or at least an excursion into nature. How much do you know about camps and camping-related facts? (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: Are you ready to go camping?

How many camp and camping-related questions can you answer?

On Friday, May 14 at Meadow Gardens Golf Club in Pitt Meadows, Michael Caan joined a very elite club of golfers who have shot under 60 (Instagram)

Most Read